13 Unexpected Ways Getting A Boob Job Changed My Life

Whether going bigger or smaller, there’s bound to be a few shocks along the way…

Four years ago I made one of the best decisions of my life: I decided to get a breast augmentation.

After researching, saving and meeting with a few different surgeons, I went under the knife to correct a size difference and restore the fullness my bust once had before I lost weight.

Although I’m happy with the outcome, I came face-to-face with a few unexpected factors, both good and bad…

1. Proportion wise, I look amazing

Self-conscious about the size of your bum, hips or tummy? Having a sizeable bust helps balance your shape. I constantly have people asking if I’ve lost weight or upped my Pilates classes.

2. My confidence in the bedroom has gone through the roof

Before I had my operation, I’d strategically try to cover my chest with my arms or hair, or even wear my bra the entire time. After my procedure, I noticed a big change with how I felt around men. 

3. I thought bra shopping would be easier (it’s not!)

Many brands stop at a D or DD cup fitting. Before my operation I was tiny and lacked fullness, so bras would often gape. These days I actually have issues finding something that’s big enough to fit and also looks good.

4. I get better service than I used to

I’m unsure if it’s the improved confidence because I’m proud of my shape or whether it’s simply chest envy, but I really do get better service when I go into a shop or restaurant.

5. My bra size is bigger than I thought it’d be

Although my surgeon said I’d look like a D cup, I’m actually an F cup. Implants don’t squish like natural breast tissue, so bras have to fit perfectly in order to be comfortable.

6. Having said that, I can easily go bra-free without a worry 

Hollywood tape? You may as well throw it in the bin. Unlike real boobs, fake ones don’t really move. You never have to worry about wearing something skimpy and your nipple making a cameo.

7. I thought it would make me instantly happy

I guess I didn’t really prepare for what my new boobs would look like immediately after the surgery. Maybe it was the concoction of pain pills or the incredible swelling, but it took me about six weeks to know I made the right choice.  

8. I now know I’ve made the right decision every time I look in the mirror

Happiness is an inside job, but when you fix something that’s having an impact on your self-esteem, your confidence will skyrocket! I’m so happy with the result, and that’s affirmed every time I look in the mirror.

9. I had to rethink my sex style

Getting on top in the first couple of months after a boob job is OUT. You’re okay to be on the bottom, but if a guy lays flat on you he will squish them – and it hurts! When it first happened to me, it felt like my chest was going to break.

10. No, I do not want you to feel them! 

Without any warning, people grab my new bust. They believe having the procedure automatically gives them permission to cop a feel, and tell me their opinion, too.

11. They’re like expensive ornaments – look, but don’t touch 

One downside is the fact I now lack feeling. I can’t really feel my nipples, but sometimes they can be quite oversensitive. Although I love the look of them, I really don’t like them being touched at all.

12. Not being able to exercise made me crazy!

I couldn’t do a single ounce of exercise for four weeks after the op, which really got to me, mainly because I felt just flabby and untoned. (I’m a Pilates instructor, so staying in shape is my thing.)

13. I wasn’t prepared for the pain

Because my implants are under the muscle, I had an awful stretching sensation and heaviness on my chest for the first month – it was so painful! Thankfully I was prescribed powerful meds, like Valium. I had friends who felt amazing straight after theirs, so the pain factor was definitely a shock, but at the end of the day, everyone’s body is different, so you have to be prepared for a few hiccups along the way.

Comment: Have you had a boob job? Tell us what you learnt from the experience.