5 ways you can eat eggs for breakfast

Eggs are a wonderfully versatile food that can be eaten at any time of the day. Put them in a salad with lunch, a stir fry at dinner, or in a cake for dessert. They are used in different types of cuisines all over the world, and can be served with meats, vegetables, breads or noodles. Not only are there a million ways to eat them, they are also incredibly nutritious. Eggs are full of protein, omega 3 fatty acids, and vitamin A. They are also great to eat during pregnancy. However, in the western world eggs are most often eaten at breakfast. Here, we have just a few options for you to try out this week.

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1. Poached shutterstock_136479254 Eggs benedict is a favorite way of eating poached eggs. Traditionally, eggs benedict describes poached eggs with wilted spinach and ham on an english muffin, covered in hollandaise sauce. To poach an egg, bring a pot of water to the boil, adding a tablespoon of vinegar. Carefully crack an egg into the water, gently stirring to make sure it doesn’t break apart too much, and forms a smooth, rounded shape. Leave for no longer than 3 minutes for a delicious, runny yolk.

2. Baked shutterstock_98776874 Shakshuka is a popular middle eastern version of baked eggs in a spicy tomato sauce. For a less exotic, but equally tasty and simple recipe, try these baked eggs in ham cups. Missing a skillet? Nevermind, you can also bake eggs in avocado!

3. Omelet  shutterstock_189340868 Cooking an omelet is a difficult skill to perfect. The folding or flipping phase can often turn our omelet into something resembling a scramble. For the best results, cook your omelet on a low heat, in a small, well-greased or non-stick pan. As you can see it it cooking through, use a spatula to carefully lift one side and gently fold it over. You don’t want the middle to be too runny or dry, so make sure the omelet is moist before folding, but without any excess that will splash or spill over when folding. Also, don’t pack your omelet with toppings. It is best to dice or finely chop any fillings, and use only a pinch of each.

4. Scrambled shutterstock_185793890 I would argue that scrambled eggs are the easiest eggs to cook. You don’t need to worry about runny yolks, or delicate flipping techniques. Just whip your eggs in a bowl with some milk, cream or butter, throw them in a pan and fold as they cook. I know – there are chefs rolling their eyes at me right now! But take it from Tetsuya, and try his ricotta and creamed corn scramble.

5. Fried shutterstock_203204710 The hardest part about frying eggs is definitely cracking them open! The number of times I have cursed myself for breaking a yolk or making a mess of the shell. There will always be arguments as to whether the corner of a bowl, or a flat surface is the best for cracking eggs – but personally, I prefer the flat surface. Cook to your liking – Runny? Sunny side up? – and serve with bacon in a bread roll, or with baked beans and toast.