Instagram, Facebook, Breastfeeding, Parenting, Mothers, Nudity Poilicy

Welcome to the 21st century; an age of selfies, belfies and now brelfies. In case you’re unaware of what a brelfie is, it’s a selfie of a women breastfeeding, and it is now officially allowed to be shared on Instagram.

So why is this a big deal? Both Instagram and Facebook are known for being biased against pictures of women breastfeeding  or any picture which shows a women’s nipple, for that matter  often claiming they are “inappropriate.” So recently when the social media sites changed their nudity guidelines to allow photos of women “actively breast-feeding,” women could breathe a sigh of relief.

Breastfeeding in public is nothing to be ashamed of, however it has always been a controversial subject, especially when photos of it are shared via social media. A lot of mums, including celebrities have experienced a tonne of backlash when posting their pics, with some even having their accounts deleted. Cue the #brelfie movement – an Instagram campaign that involved posting breastfeeding selfies in a bid to push back at social stigmas.

It seems that angry mums are a force to reckoned with. While the social media sites have still not allowed women to freely expose their nipples, they have since changed their stance on breastfeeding, post-mastectomy scarring and even nude paintings. “We know that there are times when people might want to share nude images that are artistic or creative in nature, but for a variety of reasons, we don’t allow nudity on Instagram,” reads the new policy.

“This includes… some photos of female nipples, but photos of post-mastectomy scarring and women actively breastfeeding are allowed. Nudity in photos of paintings and sculptures is OK, too.”

The new rules demonstrate a positive step towards changing social attitudes towards women’s bodies and breasts, particularly when it comes to something as natural and beautiful as pregnancy. It’s strange to think that sharing pictures of ourselves in scant bikinis with our bare backsides on show is more acceptable than a biological act such as feeding your baby.

So, what do you think of Instagram and Facebook’s change of policy?

Image via Shutterstock