hair trends, hair colour, diy, colour hair at home, tips

If you’re looking to save some cash on your next fabulous hair-do, why not colour your hair at home. It has to be said that colouring your own hair takes a lot of practice and persistence, but don’t let this stop you from giving it a try. Even flawless hair can come from an inexpensive box, just follow our top tips before you re-touch or completely colour your hair at home.

Broken hair

Suffer from broken hair, split ends and heavily damaged locks? Colouring your hair at this point may not be an option since it could damage your roots and ends even more. Wait until your hair is healthy again, or snip off the ends before colouring. Peroxide could thin out and damage hair, so be careful and keep your hair healthy by treating it to an intense hair masque every few weeks.

Temporary colour

If this is your first DIY hair colouring experience, choose a temporary colour instead. These dyes only last for a few weeks (or washes), and if you’ve made a mistake along the way, you won’t be required to live with it for months on end. This is a great starting point to build your technique and practice before going for the real thing.

Strand test

There may be a chemical in the dye you may be allergic to which is rare, but a strand test is highly recommended. If you’re using a new colour for the first time, do a strand test on a piece of inconspicuous hair to test how it will look like once developed.

Unwashed hair

It is best to use dye on hair which has been unwashed for 2-3 days. This is because oils are released onto the ends and all over the scalp, which help to hold the colour better and absorb it over time. It is best not to colour hair which has been freshly washed, since the colour may not set very well into the follicle.

Brushes

Colouring kits aren’t usually equipped with brushes, but you can find these products in convenience stores or supermarkets. Sometimes gloves make it difficult to distribute hair dye evenly across the length and roots, but using a brush will get those hard to reach places with ease.

Long and thick hair

You may find that thick or longer hair requires two boxes of dye instead of one. Only you can determine if you’ll need more than one box, but it’s better to be safe than sorry! Buy a box just as a back-up if it is the first time colouring your hair at home. It will save you another trip to the supermarket or chemist if the formula isn’t enough.

Roots

Start with colouring the roots, then move down to the length of your hair. Section off your hair, and start from the front of your head then make your way to the neck. Don’t forget above the ears! Place another mirror at the back so you can see which sections of your hair need to be coloured.

Developing time

This time may vary from each hair colour you use, but most require 25-45 minutes for the colour to actually work. Section off your hair with clips or even use a shower cap to keep it all together in one confined space. Don’t start to worry if your hair is turning an odd colour, it usually does not represent what your true colour will look like. Simply wash hair with lukewarm water until the water runs clear, then use the conditioner supplied. It will leave your hair feeling silky smooth and shiny.

Tips

  • While waiting for the dye to develop, any itchiness or irritability on the scalp is usually due to the peroxide. If this pain increases and feels unbearable, wash off the dye completely. There are many dyes which are peroxide and ammonia free if you are allergic.
  • If you spot some dye on your face, neck or hands, simply apply some moisturiser and wash off with soap and warm water. This will remove any stains on the skin.
  • Use older clothes and towels since the dye could potentially stain your clothes.
  • For very long hair, don’t be afraid to bring along a friend who can help you out. An extra set of hands will be much appreciated since colouring your own hair can be stressful and tedious.

Image via  Lipstiq

By Felicia Sapountzis