entertaining-the-kids-on-a-budget

Congratulations! You’ve made it more than halfway through the holidays without giving the kids away for adoption. Some of you may have thought about it though, so you’ll be hunting for some budget ideas to keep them busy, now and in the future. These ideas can occupy kids of various ages, will keep them out of mischief, encourage their creative side and keep them away from technology. They are also excellent for cognitive or motor development. As they get a bit older, they can do these activities unsupervised and you won’t need to hear that never ending  cry that they’re bored.

Sandpits

Sandpits don’t need to be works of art or inside tiny little shells. Especially to entertain older kids, just get a trailer load of sandpit sand and literally dump it anywhere! If you don’t have a trailer, you can get it delivered and it will still be great value for money.

Free sided sandpits are much safer, more fun and hygienic than the ones in neat little boxes. Your kids can pile the sand into a mound and jump in and out of it without injury and the sand dissipates into the grass or garden easily and just dispapears. Therefore, it won’t get old, moldy and germ ridden. It’s just like being at the beach, but it’s right in the backyard. When it gets low, just grab another trailer load and they will think it’s Christmas!

When my boys were younger, I set ours up so they were close enough to the house that I could hear them, but far enough away so by the time they reached the back door, most of the sand was still in the garden, not in the house. They could wander out there at will and I didn’t need to supervise every second of every day. They could use their imaginations and get precious time away from me to create and explore. I loved the sound of their voices out there knowing they were having fun, staying safe and being outside.

The busy box

I got the busy box idea from Playschool almost 20 years ago. It was a favorite with my kids during hot, cold or wet days. It grew in size from a small container and expanded as the kids got older and started sourcing their own materials. They would ask friends and relatives to save stuff for them and before long we were collecting enough to take extra stuff to their Playgroup and school for others to share.

We bought some things, like paints, textas, pencils, chalk, glitter, plain and colored paper. The rest was collected. They sourced old magazines, scraps of wrapping paper, bows and ribbons, cardboard rolls, discarded plastic containers or jars, pegs or pop sticks. It was only limited to their imagination, so we had a bit of everything. The hardest thing was keeping them out of the recycling bin!

We also collected stuff during outings for them to take home and make wall hangings or add to scrapbooks. Things like shells, small pebbles, flowers, leaves, gum-nuts, seeds, feathers, pamphlets of the attractions we visited, photos we took and even soil samples! These decorated their rooms, were given to friends and family, made into cards and wrapping paper, plus I always had something new and spectacular to hang on the fridge or frame and take to the office.

Image via blessingsmultiplied.com