Lisboa Palace, Karl Lagerfeld, Macau hotel, Fashion, Travel, China

Just when you thought 80-year-old Karl Lagerfeld might take a break, or perhaps just slow it down a little – he is designing a hotel. Yes, you read right, a hotel. It is not enough for the fashion icon to be at the wheel of two of the biggest luxury labels in the world (Chanel and Fendi), while designing Coke bottles, filming, photographing or even transforming supermarkets into fashion runway shows. Lagerfeld will use his inspiring imagination to collaborate with Sociedade de Jogos de Macua to build a 20-story, 270-room hotel tower.

Lagerfeld announced to WWD that he was going forward with the plan to eliminate his agitation. “[I would approach this] like my own houses and apartments, but I have more houses than I need, and I don’t want to do any more. So I can… get rid of my frustration by doing hotels” he said.

The designer followed with a statement expressing his enthusiasm “An entire hotel designed by me. It’s the first time for me. I think the idea is great!” he said.

The casino operator, like Lagerfeld, confirmed the development to open in 2017 with much excitement. Macau turns over approximately six times more cash than the Las Vegas strip, as it is the only place in China gambling is legal. In 2012 alone, the premium position brought in $38 billion in revenue.

Crafting a project of fashion and style combined with gambling has intensified competition between the complex’s Wynn Resorts and MGM Resorts International who are to also operate casinos. The opening though is years to come but will surely be something to keep an eye on. Lagerfeld’s tower will be situated within the ‘Lisboa Palace luxury development’, along with a Versace-themed hotel designed by the Italian label. What fashion savvy traveller will not want to stay there?

Lisboa Palace, Karl Lagerfeld, Macau hotel, Fashion, Travel, China

The question on everyone’s lips at the moment is what will the hotel actually look like? Though a bit vague, Lagerfeld described the anticipated design to WWD as “19th century style” but “modern at the same time”. The key will be bringing fashion to the real world in a practical yet elegant way… with the Karl Lagerfeld magic touch, of course.



Image via Vanity Fair

By Amy Miller