France have launched an air strike against ISIS in retaliation to the recent attacks in Paris.

Last night France initiated air strikes against Syria, dropping bombs over ISIS hotspot, Raqqa in retaliation to the horrific terror attacks that ocurred in Paris this Fridayjust hours after France and the US pledged to “intensify” the campaign against the terrororist group.

According to the French defence ministry, 10 aircrafts unleashed 20 bombs over ISIS’s main command centre, munitions depot and training camp in Raqqa on Sunday night.

The attack in Syria comes as France and Belgium launch a manhunt for suspected eighth extremist, Abdeslam Salah, in the Paris attacks that killed 132 people and injured over 350.

In the meantime, French prime minister, Manuel Valls has suggested the country extend its state of emergency in order to provide additional investigative powers to police forces that could be extended beyond 12 days, a move that would require approval by parliament.

“Our action in Syria…needs to be extended to annihilate Daesh [ISIS],” Valls told TF1 television.

“French nationality should be taken away from those who flout the values of the Republic,” he added, suggesting a possible deviation from current legislation preventing nationality stripping.

A map demonstrating ISIS's stronghold over Syria.

A map demonstrating ISIS’s stronghold over Syria.

Russian president Vladimir Putin was also keen to weigh in, sending French president Francois Hollande a telegram to voice his support.

“It’s clear that real joint efforts of the entire international community are necessary to effectively fight this evil,” Putin said.

And though Hollande was the only major political figure absent from the G20 summit in Turkey this Sunday as he oversaw intensified security operations, discussions continued to focus on Paris, with world leaders uniting in condemning what Hollande deemed “an act of war”.

The Paris attacks have reignited calls for tighter border controls across Europe, adding to debate over the migration crisis.

“We should not mix the different categories of people coming to Europe. The one responsible for the attacks in Paris…he is a criminal and not a refugee and not an asylum seeker,” EU chief Jean-Claude Juncker said before the summit.

“I would invite those in Europe who try to change the migration agenda we have adopted – I would like to remind them to be serious about this and not to give in to these basic reactions that I do not like. I see the difficulty but I don’t see the need to change our general approach.”

US deputy national security adviser, Ben Rhodes, said he was confident that France and the US would “intensify our strikes…to make clear there is no safe haven for these terrorists.”


Image via dailybeast.com.