How The Shape Of Your Vagina Affects Your Orgasm

Who knew?

It’s not just our bodies that come in all different shapes and sizes, it’s our vaginas, too.

And groundbreaking new research is finding the shape of yours may have a significant impact on your ability to have an orgasm. Considering most studies estimate the average woman has just one orgasm on average for every three a man enjoys, this would explain a lot. So if you’ve ever had difficulty reaching climax, it may have nothing to do with sexual anxiety (aka: ‘it’s all in your head, you just need to relaaax…’) and everything to do with genetics.

Leslie Hoffman of the Department of Anatomy at Indiana University School of Medicine and her colleagues found women whose clitorises were further away from their vaginal entrances tended to have a much more difficult time achieving the big O.

Conversely, it was found that women whose clitoris and urinary opening were closer together have a much higher likelihood of reaching climax. According to Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction affiliated faculty scholar, Elizabeth Lloyd, the ideal distance is just under an inch (or 2.5 centimetres).

But what about achieving orgasm through penetration alone? According to science, the clit-free orgasm is a total myth.

“Ninety per cent of them [women who say they orgasm through penetration alone] say they have to be on top. Guess what? When you’re on top, sitting on the partner’s erection and grinding his abdomen, it’s really not just a vaginal orgasm. You’re rubbing your clitoris on his abdomen or pelvis,” explains OB-GYN, Maureen Whlihan.

Despite ongoing debate around the existence of the G-spot, a recent study published in Clinical Anatomy states there’s no anatomical structure in a vagina that could support a true vaginal orgasm.

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‘The vagina and clitoris are two separate structures: the vagina has no anatomical relationship with the clitoris,’ the study’s authors wrote.

Hmm. My entire sex life just flashed before my eyes.

‘The correct and simple anatomical term to describe the cluster of erectile tissues – i.e. clitoris, vestibular bulbs and pars intermedia, labia minora, and corpus spongiosum of the female urethra – responsible for female orgasm, is ‘female penis.”

In fact, the clitoris and penis have a lot more in common than you might think. Though significantly smaller, the clitoris is a similar shape to the penis, and increased blood flow causes both to engorge as orgasm approaches. Unfortunately the clit isn’t quite as easy to stumble upon as the penis when it’s not erect, so knowing your own anatomy is critical to making your way to Pleasure Town.

Since the penis itself cannot stimulate the clitoris during sex, the experts recommend a combo of masturbation, oral sex, or manual stimulation by your partner to ensure your clit isn’t forgotten like an XXS tee on a sale rack.

“In all women, orgasm is always possible if the female erectile organs, i.e. the female penis, are effectively stimulated during masturbation, cunnilingus, partner masturbation, or during vaginal/anal intercourse if the clitoris is simply stimulated with a finger,” says study co-author Dr. Vincenzo Puppo.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to do some more thorough research.

Comment: Do you struggle to achieve orgasm during sex?