30 per cent of women say work affects their social life negatively! Get your balance back on track with these tops tips from Caitlin Reid, author of “Health and the City”.

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Many of us want to achieve work-life balance; that is, the ability to
effectively manage our paid work with career goals, personal
responsibilities and community interests. Yet for many of us, the idea of
achieving work-life balance remains elusive.

While technology such as laptops, mobile phones and Blackberries, were
developed to save us time, in actual fact they cause us to work longer hours than ever before and make us contactable 24:7. Being expected to answer work calls outside of work hours makes the distinction between work and home life hard to find. Overtime saps us of our energy, escalates our stress levels and deprives us of valuable time with our loved ones, all while making us a sleep-deprived nation.

Too much work and not enough play, means we miss personal milestones,
neglect our health, lose the ability to relax and fail to contribute to the
community. While it may be difficult to strike a balance between work,
relationships, social, community, home, and personal time, neglecting just
one of these areas can threaten the vitality of all. To help you achieve a
better balance in your life follow these helpful hints.

Identify your priorities: Determine your priorities in life. Is your health
or your career more important? When you have identified your priorities,
keep a log and assess how much time devote to these areas each week. Ideally
you should see a correlation between the two. If you don’t, then chances are
you are spending too much time of activities that are not as important to
you as you think. If possible, outsource these tasks.

Manage your time: Allocate your time efficiently for both work and home
life. At the end of each day, set your priorities for the following day and
designate a strict time frame for each task. Be realistic about what you can
achieve in a certain amount of time, so that you don’t take on too much
work. At home, spread the chores out over the course of the week, instead of
leaving them all until the weekend. Then, enjoy some ‘you’ time on the

It’s ok to say ‘no’: Many of us find it difficult to say ‘no’ when others
ask us to do favours for them. But learning to say ‘no’ to the activities
you take on out of guilt, will give you more time for the activities that
really mean the most to you.

Caitlin Reid is a health and fitness expert, practising nutritionist and
author of “Health & The City” – www.healthandthecity.com.au, $22.95.

ASK CAITLIN – each month we’ll take three reader questions on health,
fitness and nutrition and give them to Caitlin to answer. Authors of the
three published questions will receive a copy of “Health & The City”. Email your question to melissa@shesaid.com with HEALTH in the subject line or post it below!