If Amy Schumer Is ‘Plus-Sized’ Then What The Hell Am I?

Bad move, Glamour magazine.

So Glamour magazine decided it would be a great idea to release an issue dedicated to women size 12 and up to “change the conversation” about plus-size women.

Besides the fact that labelling women based on their size is questionable enough, the most controversial part of this is that the mag included Amy Schumer as one of their ‘women who inspire’ on the cover of the special plus-size edition, alongside Adele, Melissa McCarthy, and Ashley Graham.

Schumer was clearly not impressed, sharing her thoughts on Instagram.

‘I think there’s nothing wrong with being plus size. Beautiful healthy women. Plus size is considered size 16 in America. I go between a size 6 and an 8. @glamourmag put me in their plus size only issue without asking or letting me know,’ Schumer wrote.


‘It doesn’t feel right to me. Young girls seeing my body type thinking that is plus size? What are your thoughts? Mine are not cool glamour not glamourous.’

Yep, one of America’s biggest women’s magazines calls a size eight woman ‘plus-size’… Just let that sink in for a moment. Now before you start defending the glossy saying they didn’t actually refer to Schumer as ‘plus-size’, let me stop you right there, as even just the connotation of having her name on the cover of an issue marketed everywhere as the ‘special plus-size edition’ is more than enough to get upset about.


Calling a size eight woman like Schumer ‘plus-size’ is dangerous and irresponsible.

The comedian is absolutely right to question the ethics of Glamour, especially when it comes to its influence on young readers. If they are told that a size six to eight equals being plus-size, it automatically implies size two to four being ‘normal’ and therefore, if you want to be skinny, the only way to achieve this is starving yourself down to a size zero.

It’s disturbing and irresponsible. You might as well promote bulimia and eating cotton balls soaked in juice in your magazine.

If Amy Schumer is plus-size, then what am I, along with all other average women wearing size eight to 10? Morbidly obese? Absolutely not. I am curvier than a model, I have a few fat pockets, but I am fit and healthy, and just as Amy Schumer, I don’t want to be labelled based on my clothing size.


If Amy Schumer is plus-size, then what am I?

Glamour can say this wasn’t their intention as much as they want – but they have to know better than this. A publication that reaches over 10 million readers every month needs to take their responsibility as a role model very seriously, and Glamour has clearly failed to do so.

The good thing about this is to see the support and shared sentiments among the majority of people on social media who all agree we need to stop ‘othering’ women that don’t conform to society’s almost impossible to reach beauty standards.

Melissa McCarthy, who is also featured in Glamour‘s plus-size issue, backed Schumer on her Instagram account and included an on-point quote from iconic feminist and political activist Gloria Steinem.

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‘We have to stop categorizing and judging women based on their bodies,’ McCarthy told fans.

‘We are teaching young girls to strive for unattainable perfection instead of feeling healthy and happy in their own skin. “Imagine we are linked not ranked.” Gloria Steinem”.’

How very true. What men and women – especially in the fashion and beauty industry – need to understand, is the importance of equality and inclusion instead of ‘celebrating’ certain body types, ethnicities, genders etc. We’re all normal, and we’re all human. We may look different, but pointing out the obvious isn’t going to help anyone.

How about using models of all sizes in your magazine without making a big deal of it, Glamour? Now that would be refreshing and something I would definitely want to buy. You can keep your plus-size issue. Thanks, but no thanks.

Comment: Do you think it’s time we stopped labelling women ‘plus-sized’?