winter, cold, flu, holiday season, sickness

Christmas is a time for celebration for most people in the UK and some manage to control their eating and drinking, but for those who don’t the repercussions can last for months. You might pile on the pounds during the festive season and you can also create other health problems through celebratory excess.

Excess drinking

An article in The Guardian states that many people feel the only way to get along with their families is to have an early drink. A quote by Judy O’Sullivan, head of the British Heart Foundation (BHF) says “Christmas can be a stressful time for families and it seems alcohol is the method of choice to relieve pressure. Even though it’s only once a year, it’s important to look for other ways to relax rather than reaching for the bottle”. Too much food or alcohol can be the cause of diabetes which can also lead to hearing loss. If you do start to have problems with hearing then looking at the Hidden Hearing website will help you.

Healthy eating

You may spend all year at the gym keeping fit so why ruin it when it comes to Christmas? The BBC good food guide has some simple recipes using seasonal vegetables and fruits that won’t reverse all the good work you’ve done over the course of the previous months. Instead of consuming vast quantities of heavy Christmas pudding you could always make some quick and light spiced friands, which are small sponge cakes. There are also many non-alcoholic fruit punches that are easy to make and healthy. These will also help you with the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables a day, and will use up any spare fruit.

Keeping warm and fit

Many people suffer from the cold during the winter months, especially the elderly.
If you know a neighbour who is alone during this period it won’t take much just to knock on their door and take them some warming soup. The Christmas holidays are a good time to relax but keeping fit and healthy is also important, so after having a large meal going for a brisk walk will help your circulation, burn off some calories and help you get a better night’s sleep. Regular exercise also helps boost your immune system and fresh air can reduce tension.

Avoiding a winter cold

During the winter months you are 80% more likely to catch a cold than at any other time. There may not be a cure but maintaining a healthy diet gives you a better chance of fighting it if you do catch one. There are a few ways of reducing the chance of catching a cold, especially if you have lots of family and friends around for Christmas.

Making sure that you wash your hands regularly is one of the most important, especially if you are going to handle food or drinks. If someone around you does have a cold then get them to use a separate towel or even disposable paper towels, it’s better than passing the cold to other people and ruining their New Year.