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… a showcase of successful and talented women. The women featured in this section are have achieved a level of professional success that most of us can, and do, aspire to.

The women who appear on this page are selected by consensus of the SheSaid editorial staff and are duly invited to participate. If you wish to nominate an inspiring woman to appear in this ‘moving and shaking hall of fame’, please contact us.

Name Annette Sampson

Occupation/Title Personal finance editor

Company/Organisation The Sydney Morning Herald

State NSW

Age 37

Star sign Capricorn

Describe your career progression and your current professional position.

Started as deputy editor of Manufacturers’ Monthly – someone had to do it! These were the early 1980’s when finance journalism was first starting to develop as something more than a grey area at the back of the newspaper. Moved on to edit a marketing magazine and cover broader areas of finance. After a brief stint as marketing, media and entertainment editor of the short-lived newspaper, Business Daily (only job I’ve ever had where my redundancy payout was higher than the total I earned working there), I moved to Australian Business magazine as personal finance writer. Joined the Herald in 1995 and have edited the small business, Money, and Weekend Money sections.

As personal finance editor, I’m responsible for providing stories and comment on hip pocket issues across the paper. One week that could mean looking at the latest interest rate rise, the next trying to convey complex investment concepts to ordinary readers.

Tell us a little about your book, The Money Book.

Too often finance is treated as something complex that isn’t part of everyday life. I wanted to change that with a book that is jam-packed with information readers can use to manage their finances – but presented in a way that’s interesting to read, rather than being intimidating.

As a journalist, rather than a finance professional, I felt I could bring a different perspective to money management – giving readers the tools to make financial decisions themselves rather than bombarding them with statements on what they should and shouldn’t do.