Multicultural meals

Teriyaki Chicken
with chilli, garlic, spring onion, bok choi and rice

250g chicken breast, sliced into 1cm strips
1 red chilli, trimmed and finely sliced
1 teaspoon garlic paste (homemade or bought)
4 tablespoons teriyaki sauce (homemade ? see below, or bought)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
110g beansprouts
? red onion, peeled and thickly slicd
? red pepper, trimmed, deseeded and cut into strips
pinch of salt
pinch of sugar
mixed salad leaves
cooked plain rice, to serve
1 spring onion, trimmed and finely sliced on the diagonal

Place the chicken, chilli, garlic paste and teriyaki sauce in a large bowl and mix thoroughly. Cover and marinate in the fridge for 2-3 hours.

Heat a wok over a medium heat for 1-2 minutes or until completely hot and almost smoking and add the oil. Add the chicken and any marinate from the bowl, and stir fry for about 5 minutes until all the meat is golden. Continue cooking for a further minute, then add the beansprouts, red onions and red pepper.

Stir fry for a further 2 minutes, ensuring the base of the wok doesn?t burn (you can add a teaspoon of water during this time to take some of the heat out of the wok). Season to taste with salt and sugar.

Divide between 2 plates, serve teriyaki chicken with rice and mixed salad leaves and top with spring onions.

Teriyaki Sauce (makes about 125ml)
110g sugar
4 tablespoons of dark soy
2 tablespoons of sake
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce

Place the sugar and light soy sauce in a small pan over a low heat and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Simmer for 5 minutes until thick, add the sake and dark soy sauce and allow to cool.

This recipe is from Wagamama by Hugo Arnold

Wine suggestions from Winsor Dobbin
De Bortoli Sero 2005 Unwooded Chardonnay. The Sero range is made using fruit from the King Valley in north-east Victoria, a region rapidly building a reputation for quality wines. This is a no-nonsense, zesty, fruit-driven wine ideal for everyday enjoyment. You?ll find lovely melon/fig/peach flavours in this off dry white, a percentage of which has undergone malolactic fermentation to add complexity. This is what I call a two-bottle wine. One bottle probably won?t be enough. Great with just about any white meat or fish dish. $13.