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It seems the old ball and chain still isn’t lifting his weight.

Gone are the days when a woman’s sole role was to carry out the housework, raise the children and lovingly dote on her husband.

Yet new studies are showing that while there may be more gender equality in the workforce, traditional roles within the home still appear to be alive and well.

A recent study carried out by the University of Michigan, found women – regardless of being single, in a relationship or married – still do more chores around the home than men do, with married women carrying out a whopping seven more hours of housework than their husbands. That’s almost a whole workday more.

Still, when compared to 1976, when women worked an average of 26 hours a week doing daily household tasks and men only did six, we’ve come a long way.

Yet although husbands and boyfriends have significantly upped their game, the gap is still mind-boggling, and results from a UK survey conducted by Groupon suggest it’s because women still feel pressure to uphold traditional roles. As well as this, the survey found 60 per cent of women continue to do more housework than necessary because their income makes it difficult to break out of the ‘stay-at-home mother’ typecast.

Results from the American Time Use Survey released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2014 endorse this poll, showing on average that 83 per cent of women perform household duties while just 65 per cent of men participate – and on the days they choose to help out, men only spend 2.1 hours working.

And that’s not the end of it. When married couples have children, the American Time Use Survey also revealed women spend one hour of physical care (for example bathing or feeding) for every child under the age of six, compared to just 26 minutes contributed by men.

Before continuing on a man-hating rampage about equality and workload, it is important to note that on the days they work, men pull an extra 53 minutes at the office. However, it does seem ridiculous that only 19 per cent of coupled males do their own laundry when women are already doing an excessive amount of cleaning, cooking, child-minding, garden maintenance, financial and household management.

So to all the husbands out there, you may be pulling slightly longer hours at the office, but your partner at home is still working seven hours more than you each week. Maybe – just maybe – it would be a nice sentiment if you picked up your dirty boxers, made the bed and popped on the kettle while your wife took a minute to put her feet up.

Image via weheartit.com.

Comment: Do you and your partner share the workload evenly, or are you one of the households these studies are referring to?