Turns out size really does matter. But not in the way you’d expect.

Call me superficial, but I’ve never been able to bring myself to date a guy who’s shorter than me.

There’s something about being the literal bigger person in the relationship that isn’t entirely arousing. The way I see it, a man should be sizeable enough to take on the role of human shield in the instance a hoodlum tries to make me part ways with my Chanel WOC. How is a man too short to make direct eye contact with going to do that?

I thought I was the only one with this inane mental rule, but after a quick survey of my girlfriends, it turns out I’m not alone. We all have shorter male acquaintances we think are ‘cute’ and a lot of fun, but they were all friend-zoned the second they stood up. Are we being necessarily cruel, perhaps even denying ourselves the opportunity to get to know a really great guy as more than just a dude we’re happy to snort and fart in front of? Probably. But none of us can get past the fact that there’s something emasculating about dating a man who has to look up at you when you move in for a pash.

Now a team of researchers from California’s Chapman University have actual hard evidence this (albeit shallow) theory is part of our sexual genetics. The research group surveyed over 60,000 heterosexual men and women between the ages of 30 and 44 to determine how physical characteristics like height and weight play a role in sexual attraction and found that height overwhelmingly contributed to the average number of sexual partners a person had had.

Shorter men had an average of five partners throughout their sexual histories, while statuesque guys averaged seven. Men considered atypically short were hit the hardest, reporting an average of just one to two sexual partners.

“These factors confirm that height is relevant on the mating market,” researcher Dr David Frederick said of the report.

“It is possible that for most women there is a certain minimal threshold of height after which they will consider a male as a potential sex partner, and thus men above that height will end up with similar numbers of sex partners.”

When it came to how men viewed women of diminutive stature, researchers noted only “very weak associations” in regards to the relationship between a woman’s height and the number of sexual partners she’d had.

Interestingly, one of the more striking findings of the study found that despite our cultural fixation on thinness, underweight men and women both had fewer sexual partners than their average to overweight counterparts.


Image via tallypress.com