holiday, stressed, overworking, vacation

During your working year, it’s so easy to become absorbed in your career diary; planning the meetings you’ll be in and the paperwork you have to fill out, and often holidays and time off are forgotten because work commitments seem more important. Many of us are guilty of bringing work home, checking emails and systems on our laptop after our other half has slipped into slumber.

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Stop. Breathe. Relax. You need it. Employees are entitled to holidays every year, but many are not taken due to a dedication to the job and fear of what may happen while away. No one will think badly of you for loving your job and wanting to do well in your career, but not taking your annual leave and overworking yourself puts a strain on your health, your mindset and your relationships, which can counteract all the effort you’ve been putting in.

To excel in a working environment, it’s crucial to have a healthy and positive work-life balance. Striking a harmony between letting go of work and giving into holiday relaxation can often be the most difficult part, but is essential to allow yourself to recuperate and refresh.

Before we get onto the positive effects of taking a holiday, let’s sort out the negative effects of not taking a holiday, especially on your career. It has been found that not taking proper holidays actually makes you less productive and creative than your holidaying colleagues. Over working yourself also creates added stress and over-tiredness, which can affect your sleep, moods and thought processes. Living on coffee can’t sustain you forever, so take a week off and get on a plane to a fun destination.

holiday, stressed, overworking, vacation

Having mini breaks of 3-4 days are better than not having holidays at all, though it may not give your enough time to switch off. Taking longer holidays throughout the year, such as a two week break, is a better way to free yourself from work priorities, rather than just taking a long weekend. Two weeks not only allows for travel time, which equates two days of your holiday, but it gives you time to allow your mind to relax and slowly let go of career-related buzzing in your mind. It may take a couple of days to liberate yourself, to which a long weekend doesn’t allow.

Taking a holiday really does great things to your mind. It allows you to divert your mind from work to the cocktails at the Tiki Bar in front of you, your stress levels lower and it allows you to handle stress and priorities better when you do return to work. This is not only better for your heart, but also your mental health and sleeping patterns, especially if you get a few extra ZZZs while you’re away.

It also allows you time to reconnect with your partner and family, meaning better communication and interaction. You can make great memories and rediscover passions or try new things, depending on where your holiday takes you.

One positive aspect of taking a holiday, that many people overlook, is going somewhere new, experiencing a different culture and learning a different way of life. If you’ve been dreaming of a place, take that holiday and get over there to see what it’s like! Learning about a different country or state is great for your brain, and gives you excellent stories to tell your colleagues when you return.

What’s that? You’re already filling out your annual leave forms? Good for you!

Images via dareoutloud.com and prco.com