The arts is an area that has always attracted female workers. According to the team at the Adelaide Fringe Festival, a female-dominated team can make for a pretty good working environment.The office of the Adelaide Fringe is made up of sixteen women and four men and the management team is solely women.

According to the festival’s artistic director Karen Hadfield, that is fairly common in the arts.

“I’ve always worked mostly with women, ” Miss Hadfield said. “I really like it, I find there’s a very good collaborative nature in working with women.”

She says that women are attracted to the arts for a number of reasons. “It’s very rewarding, it can also be quite flexible too and there are some major advantages to that.”

Jennifer Moody is the publicist for the Fringe. She has worked in male-dominated offices as well as her present female environment and says there are certainly differences between the two.

Miss Moody says that women are more likely to talk about their lives outside the office and are more open with each other. Men are more likely to talk about something not related to them, such as football.

But while she finds women more open, Miss Moody thinks it is men that are friendlier outside of work hours. “Every office I’ve worked in with a strong male balance, after work drinks has been a strong cultural aspect of the company. I think that breeds a bit more mateship within the office. A bit of camaraderie,” she said.

For both Miss Hadfield and Miss Moody, the focus has not been on the gender of their co-workers but on the Fringe environment itself. “There’s no oppression in any sense. Everyone is very comfortable and open with each other. My first impression of the office was how comfortable everyone was,” Miss Moody said.

by Kiri James, acting editor CareerOne.

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