deadlift, women's fitness

You’d hope by now that everyone has heard of the deadlift. But for those who haven’t, don’t let the name scare you, because it is something you’re going to want to incorporate into your gym circuit.

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A deadlift, which is mainly used for legs, butt and lower back training, is in simple terms: picking up a weighted bar off the ground. But for your body, it involves so many muscles that you didn’t even think would be working to help lift the weight.

Deadlifts are often portrayed by bulky men, with oversized muscles and hugely weighted bars that look as if they may bend under pressure, and this can scare women off the exercise. However, in reality, the deadlift is one of the best exercises we can do to gain strength, build lean muscle and burn fat.

Performing a deadlift engages the butt and legs, the upper and lower back, and the abs. Deadlifts are great for core strength and when bracing with the abs, will help you flatten the stomach and get that six pack you’ve been working so hard for.

deadlift, women's fitness

Not only are deadlifts great for building a fabulous body, when performed correctly, they strengthen the back muscles to eliminate back and leg pain. There is a preconceived myth that deadlifts are bad for your back, but anything will be if you perform it incorrectly. When a deadlift is performed correctly, it strengthens your back muscles, while other muscles protect it from injury.

This whole body workout, exercise and strengthener is a great addition to your gym routine. You should start small with your weights to ensure you can correctly lift, and then gradually build up the weight to really challenge your body and get a great figure.

There are also simple variations of the deadlift that you can try to switch up your sessions. A sumo deadlift, stiff leg deadlift or single leg deadlift can be used to fire up the glutes and work all your muscles in a different way.

It’s best to consult your personal trainer before trying new moves, to ensure the exercise is performed correctly and without harm to your body.

Images via Life Plus Fitness and Huffington Post