19 Ways To Care For Your Mental Health This World Mental Health Day

October 9, 2019

October 10 is World Mental Health Day, and that’s as good a time as ever to start prioritizing your mental health.

Millions of people around the world are affected by mental illness.

In fact, mental health issues like anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are all on the rise, with an estimated one in every five people currently affected. And no one’s immune – whether you’re rich and successful, happily married, or young, fit and physically healthy, anyone can be touched by a mental health condition at any time.

So why do we so often pretend mental illness doesn’t exist?

As pervasive as it is, many of us still feel a lot of shame around mental illness; there’s a stigma surrounding it that’s tough to shake; a feeling that our employers won’t understand, our friends and families will just think we’re being dramatic, or that it’s something we should simply be able to “snap out of”.

So, each year, World Mental Health day rolls around, aiming to improve understanding around mental illness, provide support for those affected and advocate for more accessible, better quality mental health care.

Whether you suffer from depression, anxiety, or something else, know that you are not alone. In the meantime, here are 19 things you can do to take care of your mental health right now…

1. See a therapist

You don’t need to be in crisis to be in therapy; anyone can benefit from it. Being able to talk things over in a safe environment, with a professional, is something no one should be embarrassed about, and everyone should try.

2. Get plenty of sleep

Lack of sleep, or of good quality sleep, plays havoc with your system. People who are sleep-deprived are more prone to moodiness; it can trigger manic episodes in people with bipolar disorder. Inability to focus, anxiety, and depression can also stem from poor sleep.

3. Drink lots of water

Dehydration can not only make you feel foggy and sluggish, it can make you depressed and anxious. So drink up.

 

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Today is R U OK Day and SHESAID are reaching out and asking you to check in with yourself, your friends and your loved ones. Even though days like today are amazing conversation starters, we need to normalise the discussion of mental health to the point where we don’t need specific days where it’s ok to speak up. Everyday should be R U OK Day. We need to constantly be checking in and talking about mental health so we can get rid of the stigma that still takes so many lives. Team SHESAID are pledging to make everyday R U OK Day and we think you should too. So join us in having difficult conversations that will save lives and break down the stigma we have around mental illness. Who’s with us? ✨⠀ ⠀ If you or someone you know is struggling you can reach out to these resources for help: ⠀ UNITED STATES: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline⠀ (Call 1-800-273-8255) ⠀ ⠀ AUSTRALIA: Lifeline (Call 13 11 14) ⠀ ⠀ UNITED KINGDOM: Samaritans (Call 116 123) ⠀ ⠀ 📸: @mellow.doodles #ruok #ruokday #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #support

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4. Eat well

Too much sugar and other junk food isn’t just bad for your body; it’s bad for your brain. Add lots of dark green leafy veggies and omega-3 fatty acids to your diet – they’ve been shown to support mental health.

5. Get some exercise

Endorphins are the body’s natural antidepressant. Aim to get your heart rate up and break a sweat for 30 minutes at least six days a week.

6. Go outside

Fresh air and sunshine will do wonders for your mental health. Going for a short walk or sitting in the sun for just 15 minutes can turn your whole day around.

7. Nurture your friendships

People who are lonely and isolated are at far greater risk of depression. Reach out to your friends and make sure they know how much you value them. Here’s an idea: throw more spur-of-the-moment parties.

8. Shut down negative self-talk

When you catch yourself saying things to yourself that you’d never say to a friend, knock it off. Don’t get caught in the self-defeating trap of negative thinking. Instead, do things that build your self-esteem.

9. Learn stress-management techniques

Meditation, hot baths, running, doodling, gardening, yoga – find something that relaxes you during stressful times. Everyone gets stressed out; the key is knowing how to deal with it. Because if you ignore it, stress can make you seriously ill – both mentally and physically.

10. Steer clear of toxic relationships

If you feel drained after hanging out with a friend, that may be a sign that the friendship isn’t healthy for you. Don’t be afraid to reevaluate your relationships and say goodbye to the ones that aren’t feeding your soul.

11. Spend time near the ocean

Researchers have found that staring into what they call “blue space” can ease depression and anxiety. So start planning that beach vacation now.

12. Be grateful for everything

No matter how bad things are, there’s always something to be grateful for. Start your day by focusing on three things you’re thankful for (coffee can totally be one of them). Take things up a notch by using a gratitude journal to record your positive thoughts, so you can reflect back on them when you’re caught in a negative thought cycle.

13. Practice natural methods for relieving anxiety

If you suffer from panic attacks, there are lots of ways to manage your anxiety naturally. Xanax and other prescription meds have their place – and thank goodness for them – but making some simple lifestyle changes can help you need them less often.

14. Cut down on your alcohol intake

Alcohol is a depressant, so contrary to popular belief, if you’re feeling down, drinking isn’t likely to help. Even one drink can trigger depression in some people and lead to dependency issues; so try going sober for a while and notice what happens to your mood.

15. Set aside time for self-care

You can’t be a good partner, parent, or friend if you don’t take good care of yourself. Stop putting yourself last. Self-care isn’t selfish.

16. Take up a new hobby

Creativity and learning new things improves your mental health: science says so. Learn to play the piano, take a pottery class, or write a poem: it’s good for you.

17. Spend less time online

Staring at screens from the moment we wake up to the time we fall asleep, scrolling Instagram on our phones, is not good for our mental health. In fact, cutting down can be as hard as quitting drugs. Try to do it anyway.

18. Prioritize your sex life

Having regular hot sex isn’t just good for your relationship, it’s good for your whole self. Along with food, water, and air, sex is one of our basic human needs. Don’t let it fall by the wayside.

19. Laugh more

There’s nothing like a good belly laugh to cheer you up, no matter what else is going on in your life. Laughter is good for the brain, body, and soul. Watch this for inspiration.

For 24/7 mental health support in your country, head to:

United States

NAMI helpline: 800-950-NAMI, or text “NAMI” to 741741 to be connected to someone who can help.

Australia
Beyondblue: 1300 22 4636

NZ
Lifeline: 0800 543 354

UK
Samaritans: 116 123

Image via pexels.com

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Join the discussion: What do you do to take care of your mental health each day?

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