A-day-in-the-life-of

Why I Chose To Work With Dead People For A Living

I used to play amongst the coffins or chat to the guys as they were polishing the hearses.

March 24, 2016

A Day In The Life Of… Erin James

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: A Day In The Life Of… Carissa Walford 

Name and role

Erin James, plays Monica in The Little Death movie

Tell us a bit about what you do?

I guess I would describe myself as a storyteller and a communicator, bringing characters to life on stage and screen. I love engaging with people and connecting with them in as many ways as I can. What I love about my job is that I can work in so many different mediums. For the past 10 years, I have told stories in musicals, plays, cabarets, concerts and film with a host of incredible people. There has never been a dull moment, there is always something new and exciting around the corner (even when you least expect it) and that’s terribly exciting.

When did you discover your talent? Did you always want to be an actress?

I’m sure my family will say that I’ve always had a flair for the dramatic, but I’ve never thought that it was my only option. Just as I love working in a profession which is ever-changing, evolving and always different, I am equally interested in other professions and other means of communication. I thrive when I’m learning. I discovered my love of storytelling very early on (my first acting role was playing the role of Alice in a primary school musical version of Alice in Wonderland!) but I don’t remember making the choice to pursue a career in the arts. It just happened. (And thank goodness it did). No two days are ever the same, no two jobs are ever the same and that is an absolute joy.

My early training was actually in dance (my first tap dancing lesson at age five was really the start of it all) but I studied music, musicology, voice and acting throughout my teenage years. I guess I was an inquisitive child and never stopped asking questions about all kinds of occupations. I was lucky enough to have a great support network around me who all encouraged me to remain focused on academia and remain inquisitive about the world. I’m got a Graduate Diploma in Music, so have taught HSC music at high schools in NSW, I gained my NAATI Accreditation as a sign language interpreter for the deaf and have worked in that capacity since 2007. I run an online business and I’m still studying now, would you believe! I’m in my second year of Post-Graduate Law and I’m finding it absolutely thrilling! I think as an actor you can’t be too inquisitive.

Where do you find your inspiration? Who has had the most impact on you and your career?

When I was very young I watched all of the old Hollywood movie musicals I could get my hands on with my grandmother. We started with Shirley Temple films and moved onto movies starring Fred and Ginger, Gene Kelly, Marilyn Monroe and Judy Garland. I suppose my early inspiration was from these artists who spoke to me through the television set. In terms of having an impact on me as a creative person and my career, well that’s a very hard question to answer quickly. I love to learn – I don’t think we ever stop learning – so I think I have taken a little inspiration from almost everyone who has helped shape my career over the years. From the unwavering support of my family to my the teachers who have carefully taught me my craft. I suppose if I had to pick one person, it would be my mum. She is my lucky charm and my most honest critic. I still use her reactions to my work as a gauge.

Its not always bright lights and glory. How do you deal with the challenges and down times?

I am now a master at living out of a suitcase and I can pack a travel bag in record time! It is true; the bright lights and flashy side of show business is only a very small part of the job. It is hard being away from loved ones, but missing important life events because of production schedules and and working odd hours means you become very good at making the most of the time you’ve got, while you’ve got it. Also, the internet (especially Skype) has certainly helped make the world a smaller place and helped keep me connected to my family when I’m away. I’ve been very lucky in my career that I always feel busy. There is always something to work towards, always something to focus on. This could be in the form of an audition, a job, a personal goal or creating new work. That’s how I deal with the challenges: always look ahead, never look back.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, Actress, Actor, Singer, Performer, Mentor, Career Development, Life Advice

What role has had the most effect on you? Tell us a bit about your latest projects…

Professionally, Monica in The Little Death had the biggest impact. It was my first major film role and something which I am very proud of. I learned so much working on that shoot from everyone involved, not least of all our incredible director and writer Josh Lawson. Being nominated for two awards (AACTA Award and Film Critics Circle of Australia Award for Actress in a Supporting Role in a Feature Film) absolutely blew my mind. I had a great time shooting a short film with Tom Ward (from Please Like Me) which will premiere at the Adelaide Film Festival this October and I’m currently rehearsing for the Australian tour of CATS the musical with the lovely Delta Goodrem.

What are your goals for the future?

I would love to work more in the film and TV realm. It’s a medium which I am falling in love with the more I work in front of a camera.

What advice would you give to someone following the same path as you?

Focus, hard work and planning are just as important as talent and passion. Be kind to yourself, but remain vigilant in keeping your skills honed. You never know when they might come in handy (Side note: I was cast in The Little Death in a role that required the use of Auslan after having worked with a deaf theatre company in my first year out of drama school. If I hadn’t retained all of the language and made a point of keeping that skill up, I wouldn’t have been able to audition for the role in the first place!)

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. When you’re preparing or performing, what does a typical day involve?

My days are rarely ‘typical’, but I’ll take you through a day in my life when working on a major music theatre production.

Early am: Wake up in time to chat to my husband before he starts work (could be VERY early depending upon time zone differences)

9:30am: Cup of English breakfast tea, two weetbix and sultanas. I’ve had the same breakfast for as long as I can remember.

10am: Yoga time. Whether I’m on tour or at home I try to make sure I fit my daily yoga practice into my morning routine. If I’m performing in a musical, it’s especially necessary to wake up the body, stretch and strengthen muscles and start the day well.

11am-1pm Work time. Running an online business means lots of emails. I try to make sure all of my administration is done early in the day so I can move onto other work (like learning scripts and songs) later in the afternoon.

1pm: Lunchtime! – Catching up with a friend for lunch is one of my favourite things – especially since I’m often away from my close friends while working.

2:30 – 4:30pm: My time. Catching up with my family, learning material, scripts, songs. A reformer pilates class, depending upon the day. Getting ready for the theatre.

5:00pm: Dinner. With a performance at 8pm, I try to make sure I’ve eaten with enough time to digest before heading to the theatre.

6pm: Theatre. There are many things to do before the curtain goes up at 8pm, so I try to arrive at the theatre between 6pm and 6:30pm. I always do a full vocal and physical warm-up before the show so I minimise my chance of injury and fatigue.

11pm: Once the show is finished, it’s time to wind down with the cast. I love to have a glass of red wine and some delicious cheese before heading home.

Images courtesy of Kurt Sneddon at Blueprint Studios

September 23, 2015

A Day In The Life Of… Amber Scott

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: A Day In The Life Of… Jordan Mercer

Name and role

Amber Scott, principal artist with the Australian Ballet

Tell us a bit about what you do?

My life as a ballerina is a combination of dedicated routine alongside a great deal of travel and performing. From the outside, a life on the stage and performing around Australia and overseas may seem glamorous, but in reality there is a hidden backstage world where all dancers work themselves to peak physical condition every day. Sweating it out in the studio for hours leads to the reward of performing when a new season opens.

When did you discover your talent? Did you always want to be a dancer?

When I was a young girl my mother noted my boundless energy and took me to creative dance classes. I loved these as it was such a fun way to express all that energy. I grew up on the Sunshine Coast QLD so being physical was such a huge part of my youth. I feel all the running, swimming and climbing I did as a youngster really helped condition my body for the life ahead. My parents took me to see Swan Lake when I was five and it was definitely an epiphany, I think that was my fated moment when I knew what I wanted to do. Along the way, the years of training and endless dedication occasionally became a bit tedious and I probably had ulterior careers such as a paediatrician or actress up my sleeve, but my true love of dance always won out!

Inspirational Women, A Day In The Life Of, Career Development, Career Advice, Ballet, Performance, Talent, Theatre

Where do you find your inspiration? Who has had the most impact on you and your career?

I have been inspired by every teacher I have been lucky enough to learn from. My first teacher Anne Fraser was so important in teaching me the pure beauty of classical technique. Eileen Tasker from the National TheatreBallet school in Melbourne gave me the courage to go for it and try new steps and even if they weren’t perfect she gave me a real sense of joy in performing. Marilyn Rowe OBE, Gailene Stock CBE AM and Leigh Rowles picked me out from a room of eleven-year-olds to join their associate program and thus began my life within The Australian Ballet family. Marilyn Jones OBE directed me as young girl and taught me my first solo en pointe. I feel so lucky to have been inspired by these women from a young age. They all gave so generously of their time and shared their ballerina secrets with me. When I think of grace, kindness and humility I think of all these ladies. My mother is also a beacon of light for me. She gave up a lot of her dreams so I could have mine and we had so much fun learning together about this wondrous world of ballet. It’s always so special to perform when my family are in the audience. Thinking of them comforts me and makes me want to express all the joy of life when I’m onstage.

It’s not always bright lights and glory. How do you deal with the challenges and down times?

The toughest times have been when I have been off because of an injury, or having to dance through pain because of one. It is par for the course in our line of work and fortunately we have a brilliant medical team to guide us through these times and keep us strong. I certainly wouldn’t have lasted this long without their care! Sometimes early in my career the amount of shows our company perform each year (160+) would really wear me down and even though we would be performing beautiful works, the grind would be really hard to push through. Looking back I can see how all those years of pushing through endless corps de ballet roles really gives you the grit you need to have longevity in this career.

What role has had the most effect on you? Tell us a bit about your latest projects…

I think the role of Odette in both Graeme Murphy’s and Stephen Baynes’ versions of Swan Lake have had the biggest impact on my career. It was my first big break when David McAllister asked me to be Odette when I was 21. I still feel so grateful for that leap of faith he took in me, it was terrifying and wonderful all at once! I still am dancing that role and growing with the ballet each year we perform it. I think I will always be learning more about her character. The other special Odette moment was when Stephen Baynes said I would be in his premiere cast for a new traditional version. I was a principal artist at that point, terrified all over again but so humbled to be stepping into that iconic ballerina role. I love the score of Swan Lake and always find this motivates the emotions I feel for the ballet.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, Career Development, Career Advice, Life Advice, Ballet, Theatre, Performance, Talent

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. When you’re preparing or performing, what does a typical day involve?

My workday is certainly not the usual 9-5 but it also varies a great deal depending on our performance schedule. Over years of late theatre nights I am certainly not a “morning person”! Because of this I tend to push back waking up until 8am and then dawdle over breakfast. chores and emails at home. After a stop off at a local café for a flat white I get to work about 9:45am to warm up for class.

Class is generally a similar affair each day. We begin at the barre to warm and stretch our bodies and gradually the intensity increases to include turns and jumping in the centre of the room. After a 15-minute break it’s back into the studio for two and a half hours of whatever ballet is coming up. At the moment there are four different ballets being rehearsed so it is a typically busy time at the Australian Ballet. If it is a show day we will stop at 3pm to rest, eat and maybe get some physio before heading to the theatre at 5pm to put make-up on and prepare for the 7:30pm performance. After a big show I like to jump in the ice buckets up to my knees to combat any swelling or muscle soreness the next day. Then it’s time to go home and have a late dinner, usually an omelette or leftover pasta, around 11pm. Not ideal dietary advice but I prefer to relax and eat dinner after the show so I don’t feel queasy during pas de deuxs! On the days when we don’t perform I keep rehearsing after lunch till 6:30pm and then head home to cook dinner or catch up with friends and family if I can. I love cooking, it’s one of my favourite ways to unwind at the end of the day. The Ugg boots go on and then it’s straight to the kitchen to try a new recipe out with my boyfriend. Actually he is more of a “recipe” person and a great cook. I tend to make up dishes depending on what we have in the house. Luckily he is always very encouraging of my experimentation!

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, Career Development, Career Advice, Life Advice, Ballet, Theatre, Performance, Talent

What are your goals for the future?

My most immediate goal for the future is to give my all to performing Aurora and Lilac Fairy in David McAllister’s new production The Sleeping Beauty. I am loving revisiting both these roles and re-interpreting them with a more mature approach. There have been many rewarding hours spent with David and our Ballet Mistress Fiona Tonkin helping me develop my interpretation. The staff of the company spend so much time with us, they see us at our best and worst, I always feel so lucky to be able to be completely honest in the studio with them.

In the distant future, I would like to study health science and continue learning about human anatomy which is something I am currently studying online. I think it will tie in really well with my ballet background and hopefully enable me to give back to the artform in some way in the future. Of course, I hope to keep dancing as long as possible and hopefully revisit some of my favourite roles such as Tatiana in Onegin, and Manon. Beyond that, I daydream of travels to Europe, having a family, a garden, and staying happy and healthy.

What advice would you give to someone following the same path as you?

As advice for someone wanting to be a ballerina I can only offer advice based on my own experience. I think if I was speaking to myself as young person I would say, be patient and be kind to yourself. It’s natural for dancers to be very self-critical but if you spend so much energy focussing on the negative you lose that feeling of joy and escapism that dance can offer. I would also say to embrace your uniqueness. Forget about lack of physical symmetry, stiff joints, not being flexible enough, and celebrate your strengths. The audience doesn’t want to see all that worry, they want to be swept away into another world.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, Career Development, Career Advice, Life Advice, Ballet, Theatre, Performance, Talent

Amber will be performing in The Australian Ballet’s upcoming contemporary triple bill, 20:21. The show in Sydney will run from 5th – 21st of November. For tickets head to www.australianballet.com.au

September 9, 2015

A Day In The Life Of… The Style Co.

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: A Day In The Life Of… Sara Caverley

Names and roles

Marie Cruz and Sarah Gonsalves, owners of The Style Co. 

Tell us about The Style Co. How did it come about and what makes it unique to others?

The Style Co. was born from Marie’s frustrations over the lack of unique options to customise the design and feel of her own wedding. This belief that every event whether it be an wedding or private event, should be customised to make people feel something, is the oxygen that fuels our super talented team of twelve to continuously show clients that thinking outside the box is the only way to execute an event.

When did you both discover your talent? Where you always creative bodies?

Marie: I’ve always been creative, from making jewellery right through to designing stationery, so event design was a natural progression and one that only become my serious career path after years of working as travel agent left me feeling uninspired and hungry to start my own business.

Sarah: I was lulled into the world of events whilst completing an internship at a creative agency. It was here that I fell in love how styling could significantly impact people’s experiences and I knew that finally I had found my calling.

The Style Co. , Inspirational Women, events, Style, Career Advice, Career Development , A Day In The Life Of

You create beautiful custom events that continually push the boundaries, do you ever feel the pressure to continually design, create and impress?

We love the challenge of continuously thinking outside the box and designing something that is innovative, fresh and experiential. We don’t feel any pressure externally, it’s more so an internal drive within our team, that sees us always reaching for bigger and brighter ideas that we know will create lifelong memories for our clients and their guests.

Where do you find your inspiration?

Our inspiration comes from so many amazing places, particularly from this amazing city – Melbourne! We’re obsessed with architecture, interiors, fashion, travelling and soaking up the millions of beautiful images we see on blogs and Pinterest.

The Style Co is now in its fifth year of operation, congratulations! What were the initial stumbling blocks and how have you overcome them?

The finance side of the business. Day to day cashflow was difficult to manage at the beginning.  It’s not something that comes easily to a lot of creatives and also something you don’t think about when starting a creative business. Not being able to pay myself an income the first few months also meant that I took a hit personally and had to juggle bills and a mortgage.

The Style Co. , Inspirational Women, events, Style, Career Advice, Career Development , A Day In The Life Of

What are your goals for the future and the future of The Style Co.?

To continue pushing the boundaries and showing people the possibilities when designing events.  We also have our eyes set on doing a few events overseas and workshops.

What advice would you give to someone hoping to follow in the same career path as yourself?

Get as much experience as possible.  If it means putting your hand up for free work, do it.  And work hard!  Call the people in the industry that inspire you and ask them what they look for when hiring.  Each business is looking for something different.. but something we all have in common is that we’re all looking for the hardest working and most eager to learn.

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. What does a work day for you involve? Particularly if you were planning or the day of an event!

The designing and planning of an event can sometimes be more hectic than event day itself..  but there really is no typical day..

Marie

6:45am: Hit snooze on the old alarm

7am: Wake up, get ready and pack Harrison’s things

8am: Wake Harrison up, feed him and get him ready (pray to God I don’t have a screaming baby on my hands)

8.45am: Head to work with baby on board

9am: Have breakfast and check my emails

9.30am: Daily team meeting to discuss the week ahead

10am-6pm: Is generally filled with site visits, concept meetings, supplier meetings, sourcing, workshop and marketing planning all while juggling Harrison feeding routine.

6pm to 7pm: Client meetings where the team present our latest concepts

7.30pm: Put Harrison to bed, have dinner and catch up on daily gossip with hubby or watch the next episode of whatever series I happen to be obsessed with at the time

10pm: Respond to emails and troll the Internet for design inspiration or check out and obsess over unrealistic holiday destinations that I can’t take a baby to (sad face).

11:30pm: Hit the sack and hope that bub sleeps through the night.

The Style Co. , Inspirational Women, events, Style, Career Advice, Career Development , A Day In The Life Of

Sarah

6am: Alarm goes off. Denial sets in…….snooze!

6:15am: Alarm goes off again!!! Get up & shower relunctantly. Throw on some (hopefully clean) gym gear, grab a change of clothes and head out the door.

6:30am: Drive to Pilates listening to Triple J.On the way I’m brainwashing myself by repeating the mantra ‘exercise is a good thing’

7am: Pilates with some of my fellow Style Co. team members

7:45am: Pull my broken body off the reformer bed and hit the showers.

8:30am: Back in the car heading to the studio.

8:45am: Arrive at studio, make brekky whilst gossiping about the night before’s Bachelor episode. #welovebachie

9am: Sit down and map out my day and prioritising my tasks.

9:30am: Daily Meeting with the team to get a run down of everyone’s top priorities.

10:00am – 6:00pm: A standard ‘work’ day consists of lengthy phone calls with overwhelmed brides, site inspections, new client appointments, management meetings, design presentations, catching up on my fav blogs and daydreaming on Pinterest.

6:30pm: Switch into girlfriend mode (Damien my boyfriend also works at The Style Co.) and we head out for a bite to eat choosing from a Broadsheet wishlist he’s enthusiastically created over the weekend.

9:30pm: Get home, shower, read a chapter of whatever happens to be resting on my bedside table.

10:30pm: Bedtime. *High-five* Damien for remembering to turn the electric blankets on!

Images via The Style Co.

August 26, 2015

A Day In The Life Of… Jordan Mercer

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: A Day In The Life Of… Anna Flanagan

Name and role

Jordan Mercer, Surf IronWoman

Tell us a bit about what you do?

I am a professional surf athlete. My discipline changes dependent on the time of the year, but basically it’s broken into the sprint season where I compete in the Kellog Nutri-Grain Ironwoman series, before transitioning into the long-distance paddleboard season. My paddleboard specialty is the prone paddleboarding event, which means either lying down on my stomach or on my knees, paddling the ocean.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, paddleboard, Red Bull, elite athlete, talent, sportswoman, sport

The sport gene runs through your veins. At a just 13 years old you were asked by the AIS to be a part of their training squad for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. What made your turn your back on gymnastics and head to the water?

Lifestyle was probably a big one – I think deep down I knew that I did love the ocean and that coastal lifestyle. With gymnastics I had to move to Canberra to be at the AIS training for the upcoming Olympic Games – I wouldn’t be able to be at the beach. The big decision was knowing that I had a growing passion for being in the ocean – racing there and the fact that I had such a good group of girl friends. The environment and that team spirit that was created when I did surf sports was something that drew me towards a change of career path at such a young age.

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. When you’re in season, what does a typical day involve? 

I train Monday to Friday, doing three to four sessions a day. Saturday is my big session, where, depending on what time of season it is, I’m either doing very long board paddle sessions anywhere from four to six hours, or it could be an Ironwoman session, which is over and done with in an hour and 15 minutes and is extremely high-intensity – a real vomitron of a session, and the lactic usually lingers for a day or so. Sunday is ‘Sunday fun-day’ for me. I like to do a light session but usually it’s just family time, spending time with friends and generally being at the beach. I’m not quite over the beach yet so through the week I still like to go down, relax, kick the ball, and go surfing.

6am: Generally, throughout the season I’m swim training for two hours in the morning.

10am: I’ll head off from there – have a little snack and into the gym where I work out for about an hour. I like to do a lot of body weight exercises, lots of balance and strength exercises, and obviously getting the heart rate up with cardio in the gym. Sometimes, I’ve got a trainer throughout the week, other times I might be doing my own stuff in the gym. I also love to do a bit of pad boxing when I get the chance.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, paddleboard, Red Bull, elite athlete, talent, sportswoman, sport

12pm: I like to have a nap or a surf. That, for me, is refreshing and a little bit of personal time. After a nice lunch I’ll be ready for the afternoon sessions where I’ll be running, or alternating from run to gym. When I’m running I’m either at the National Park in Noosa or I like sand running. Track running’s always good too. Sometimes it’s nice to go for a flat road run. My runs go from maybe four to 10km.

3pm: For my final session for the day I’m in the ocean. I’m paddling my board or on my ski, or putting all the disciplines together and doing an IronWoman session with a run, swim, ski, board, all in the surf.  That usually goes for an hour or so and it’s my favourite session of the day.

I just like challenging myself, trying new things, being in the ocean, playing guitar, I love listening to music, creating things and spending time with loved ones and family!

When did you discover your talent? Did you always want to be an athlete?

From a young age I was always determined to be the best. Not just at sport but anything I tried, I always strived to do things perfectly. I did a lot of sports through my early years running and gymnastics being my focus. From the age of six until I was thirteen I dreamed of being an Olympic gymnast. That dream came very close to fruition when I was offered a position at the Australian Institute of Sport in the gymnastics team to train for the upcoming games. My dreams and future vision have changed through the years but sport has always remained a very important part of who I am and what I wanted to do. But one of the big moments where I thought I can do this, I can be a professional athlete was when I was 16 and in year 11 at school, when I was just old enough to trial for the professional IronWoman Series. I remember being on the beach ready to race, the surf was huge and the weather pretty wild. I hadn’t been paddling a ski for much longer than three months and my swimming wasn’t very strong. It was going to be tough, to say the least. But I knew there wasn’t one thing that would stop me from giving this trial the fight of my life. I had never wanted something so badly in my life, with every ounce of my being I wanted to become a professional IronWoman and it was going to happen that weekend! I knew I deserved it and I believed I could do it!

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, paddleboard, Red Bull, elite athlete, talent, sportswoman, sport

Where do you find your inspiration? Who has had the most impact on you and your career?

I’ve been fortunate enough to have quite a few people. Children with special needs and disabilities, which I have had the chance to work with through some amazing charities. Noosa Seahorse Nippers is for children with disabilities and special needs allowing them to enjoy junior surf life saving activities. Also, Surfers Healing and Paddle4Autism both program’s which allow Autistic children to surf and enjoy the ocean with watermen and women! Jamie Mitchell one of the best watermen in the world, 10x Molokai2Oahu World Paddle Board Champion and big wave surfer is a special mentor of mine, and a great friend. Mikey Mendoza, skating sensation and fellow Red Bull teammate is someone who makes the most out of every opportunity in life and has a contagiously powerful and positive attitude and my Aunty Jenny, for personal reasons.

What are your goals for the future?

To do what it takes to be proud of the person I am and never stop learning. I know by doing this I will be inspiring people to follow their dreams and supporting those less fortunate. To live a life of giving and learning surrounded by my loved ones, is my ultimate goal.

What advice would you give to someone following the same path as you?

Growing up I’ve been given a lot of advice and a lot of people with great experience in sport have said some pretty special things to me, but the most import piece of advice I was given was to go out there and have fun. I used to laugh it off because I found it very hard to do that with the amount of pressure that I put on myself, and how nervous I got before any event or any race or any run I did. But in the last couple of years I’ve learnt how important it is for me to enjoy myself and have fun out there. My best results have come from when I’m relaxed, when I’m out there and happy to be where I am – and so it is, I think, the most important advice I’ve been given in life and of course racing. So the best piece of advice I could pass on from my experience is hard work will beat talent if talent doesn’t work hard, and there is no easy road to any place worth going.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, paddleboard, Red Bull, elite athlete, talent, sportswoman, sport

Images via © Red Bull Media House

August 19, 2015

A Day In The Life Of… Carissa Walford

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: A Day In The Life Of… Laura Hannaford

Tell us a bit about what you do?

I write produce and present music/fashion/pop culture segments on channel V Australia. I’m also a host on Channel 10’s Movie Juice.

Give us a snapshot of your career journey. Did you always want to be where you are now?

My background is in performing arts as a trained singer, dancer and actress. I have wanted to be in the entertainment industry since I was 4 years old. My dad is a singer so I grew up around music. I went to NIDA and completed a 1-year acting course and 1-year presenting course, which helped me get to where I am today.

Where do you find your inspiration? Who has had the most impact on you and your career?

I think music is in my blood and I’ve always looked up to my dad in that department so I would say he’s had the most impact. My parents were very encouraging to follow my dreams and I never had a plan B – I just went for it.

What has been the highlight of your career so far? Is there a moment or person that has resonated with you?

I have to say meeting some of my favourite musicians and actors on a daily basis is a dream come true. Achieving great interviews by really connecting and getting a story out of people is very motivating. Most recently I interviewed Cara Delevingne. That has been my highlight this year as we connected and could have spoken for hours.

Inspirational Women, A Day In The Life Of, Television, TV Presenter, Career Development, Music, Fashion

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. What does a day for you involve?

6:30am: I wake up early and eat breakfast- I never leave the house without eating…

7am: I spend an hour or so getting ready and then I play with my dog Romeo before leaving the house.

10am: On a shoot day it can get pretty hectic – I’m writing, learning scripts and interviewing artists so I’m very focused as things move and change very quickly and you need to be able to adapt. Fast!

3pm: In terms of outfits I do all my own styling and I really enjoy putting looks together. My audience loves to know my outfit choices for the shows, so I post Instagram photos after shooting to show the brands I like to wear.

6pm: I love ending the day with a hip hop dance class [if I’m not too tired] or just going home to relax, maybe a bit of meditation or a hot bath. Its important for me to chill out as I’m ‘on’ 24/7 and it can be draining.

Inspirational Women, Television, A Day In The Life Of, Music, Fashion, TV Presenter

What are your goals for the future? Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I have learnt that the world changes quickly, so as long as I’m happy that’s all that matters. Its cliché but I’ve realised it’s the simple things in life that are pretty special. Ill always be doing what I love and what I’m passionate about – that’s all I know.

What advice would you give to someone following the same path as you?

Have patience and learn from your mistakes – they make you stronger, wiser and prepare you for your next project.

July 29, 2015

A Day In The Life Of… Anna Flanagan

Ever wanted to step into somebody else’s shoes for the day and see what life is like as a magazine editor, a professional sportsperson or corporate high-flyer..? Well, SHESAID is giving you the closest thing to your very own Freaky Friday experience with our A Day In The Life Of… series.

RELATED: Inspirational Women: Ellyse Perry

Name and role

Anna Flanagan and I am a player for the Hockeyroos!

When did you discover your talent? Did you always want to be an athlete?

I wanted to be sportswomen from as soon as I could walk- meaning as long as I can remember! I picked up my first hockey stick at four and never looked back! I always wanted to represent Australia and go to the Olympics in something. I did tennis and athletics at national level until I was 15 and chose to give everything to hockey. I always loved the feeling of winning with a team and ultimately enjoyed the sport more. When I made my debut for Australia at age 18, I realised that just playing for Australia wasn’t the goal, but being the best was. Making the team [Hockeyroos] was only the beginning of a huge journey to the top.

Tell us a bit about your journey?

I was selected into the Australian squad when I was 17 and still at school. I came through the junior ranks with two national titles and Player of the Tournament in U18s/21s and in open Nationals before I was 20. My first foray into international hockey I was 16 playing for the U21 Australian team and therefore had to grow up pretty quickly. I moved over to Perth when I was 18 away from all my family and friends and had to learn to look after myself on the other side of the country, without knowing anyone well in the team. The first year I really struggled but had my studies to distract me from being so isolated. I was a late selection into the Commonwealth Games team in Delhi, and from this moment I new I wanted not only to win gold medals, but be the best in the world.

I worked really hard physically to earn my place as one of the main players in the team. I then at 20 years old, I was voted World Young Player of the year at the Olympic Games. This brought a lot more pressure to perform but none more than what I placed on myself. From back then, knowing no one the team is like my family now. We train together everyday and I can’t imagine doing anything else.

Where do you find your inspiration? Who has had the most impact on you and your career?

My captain Madonna Blyth inspires me everyday at training to push harder and be the best you can. In other sports the females such as Jessica Fox, Caroline Buchanan and Anna Meares because they are pushing the boundaries of female sport and are good role models.

As an elite athlete, its not always bright lights and glory. How do you deal with the challenges and down times?

We train everyday so I definitely have those days or moments where I envy those with a ‘normal’ job. But I try putting it in perspective to realise not everyone can do what I am doing, and that the lifestyle is amazing and the feeling of winning with your team mates is the ultimate high.

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, life advice, talent, sportswomen, sport, fitness, Hockeyroo

Your workdays are much more exciting than the average 9 to 5. When you’re in hockey season, what does a typical day involve?  

Of course there’s no such thing as a typical day but a standard training day would look something like this:

7am: Rise and shine, I like to have breakfast two hours before training so that it has time to digest before we start a heavy session.

9-11:30am: Full team training on the pitch where we have a mixture of strength, power, speed and endurance exercises built into our drills.

11:30am-12pm: Recovery and ice baths- submerging our lower bodies into freezing cold water to help relieve muscle soreness for the following day.

12-1pm: We have lunch together and a meeting to discuss the figures that we produced in the weeks training session on our GPS and heart rate, and talk about where we need to improve and work harder as well as highlight those who have done well.

1:30pm-3pm: We have gym that consists of Olympic lifting, heavy weights and a crossfit style of work-out, depending on the individual and their needs.

6pm: Is dinner and couch time as I am buggered from the big day of training!

9:30pm: Try to get in bed by this time so that I get enough rest to do it all again the next day!

A Day In The Life Of, Inspirational Women, life advice, talent, sportswomen, sport, fitness, Hockeyroo

What are your goals for the future?

My ultimate goal is to win Olympic gold… the pinnacle of our sport. Individually I want to be the best player I can in the best team I can… therefore the best player in the world in the best team in the world.

What advice would you give to someone following the same path as you?

Always look to better yourself in all areas as an athlete. Whether it be mental or physical or technical, push the boundaries and try do what others can’t. If you believe you can and do everything to achieve it, anything is possible. The best piece of advice I’ve ever been given is good things don’t come easy. And if it was easy, everyone would be doing it. For anyone wanting to get into professional sport, I would say, you need to set goals, have a plan, be determined to achieve it and give 100%. But more than that, enjoy what you are doing, the more fun you have the more memories you make and the rewards are priceless.

July 15, 2015