Australia-day

How Aussies Celebrate Australia Day

Aussies are customarily a pretty laid back bunch so it makes sense that Australia Day, celebrated on January 26th is basically r’n’r on a grander scale. BBQ’s, fun and fireworks are generally the order of the day.

The local communities plan events around the prefect weather and laid-back lifestyle, so there is always something happening close at hand. Multiculturalism is everywhere and most Australian’s are united in true Aussie pride.

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Granted, the weather is usually superb. It somehow manages to turn it on for the celebrations and is pretty much perfect for outdoor activities all over the country. With all the sun, surf and sand at their disposal the day is typically spent outside in private back yards, local parks, pools or beaches. The water is patrolled by volunteer life savers who are always on hand as a traditional Aussie icon in small red and yellow caps.

If Aussies do want to head further than their back yards or local neighborhood, extra public transport is provided to most larger cities. This is handy, because plenty of Aussies indulge in a few drinks and most have been educated not to take their cars out if they plan to have a few.

This advantage is usually taken as the sun goes down and the masses make their way into the cites to witness the spectacle of firework displays. It’s similar to New Years Eve except there are kids everywhere as there’s no need to wait until midnight. As soon as the sun sets the skies light up in sparkling lights and massive coloured explosions.

As the day draws to a close most Aussies make their way home. As long as they’ve had loved ones to enjoy and share it with, Aussies are pretty content to spend their national day of pride relaxing by the water, swimming, playing cricket, picnicking under the shade of a tree, watching children play and enjoying their freedom. There might be the odd disruption but Australia Day is traditionally quite peaceful, being more about family, community and coming together as a nation.

If foreigners ever want to meet an Aussie, and haven’t visited the land down under, visit a licensed venue on January 26th, particularly in the UK, Bali and other Aussie tourist and backpacker hot spots. Fueled by national pride and a few liquid amber’s, they will probably be a little homesick knowing the majority of Aussies are out celebrating. Shout out the words… Aussie, Aussie, Aussie! If the hear they reply oi, oi, oi shouted back like some national mating call, they are a pretty easy crew to spot!

 

Images via burdekin.qld.gov.au, nairaland.com, s.yimg.com, australiaday2015messages.com, playandgo.com.au, resources1.news.com.au, 4.bp.blogspot.comk, picviw.com
 
January 25, 2015

BBQ For Kidney Health This Australia Day

The great Aussie barbie is a national tradition, especially on Australia Day. You won’t have to venture too far to get a whiff of that awesome smell either. Communities come alive with events planned in most neighborhoods and if you carry on festivities after dark the fireworks will complete your day. All in all, it really is the one day of the year when the great Aussie spirit is celebrated, alive and well.

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This year, Kidney Health Australia is asking us all to show that Aussie spirit by signing up for the Big Red BBQ. It doesn’t need to be held on Australia Day (in case you can’t organise it in time) but anytime during summer. Surely we can manage that, yeah?

BBQ, Kidney disease, Kidneys, Kidney Health Australia, Fundraising, Health Awareness
I suppose the folks at Kidney Health Australia figured while we’re celebrating Australia Day with all those BBQ’s we may as well roll up our Aussie sleeves and raise some much needed awareness and possibly a few bucks for our Aussie mates. Very little gets spoken about this disease despite how lethal it is so to get a glimpse of how it is effecting us Aussies, I’ve included some pretty startling facts.

Risk: 1 in 3 Aussies at risk

Estimated effected Aussies: 1.7 million

Fatalities: 56 a day

Hospitalisation: 15 per cent of all hospital admissions

Dialysis patients: 11, 446

Dialysis: 3 days a week, 5 hours a day

Awaiting transplants: 1087 – average wait 3.5 years (7 years not uncommon)

Symptoms: None.

Up to 90% of kidney function can be lost without individuals experiencing any symptoms

Pretty shocking stuff hey? So, do you recon you could raise some awareness and a few bucks for Kidney Health Australia? Registration is free, plus, you’ll receive a free event pack in the mail containing an official Big Red BBQ apron.

BBQ, Kidney disease, Kidneys, Kidney Health Australia, Fundraising, Health Awareness
Additionally, they have a 5 ingredient cooking challenge going on, prizes for the highest fundraising efforts and are now being sponsored by some big companies and talented individuals like Barbeques Galore, IKEA, Lombard the paper people and Aussie home cooking hero, Lyndey Milan.

BBQ, Kidney disease, Kidneys, Kidney Health Australia, Fundraising, Health Awareness
So come on everyone, lets enjoy our great Aussie tradition and help out some mates at Kidney Health Australia at the same time. If you want more information on registration or ways to get involved Australia Day and beyond, head to https://bigredbbq2015.gofundraise.com.au/cms/home

Image via kidney.org.au

January 23, 2015

Australia Day Recipe: Mint Pavlova

Whether your Australia Day involves throwing some prawns on the barbie, a picnic at the beach, or an outdoor party in the great Aussie tradition, a box of Ballantyne Chocolate Coated Sticks is the perfect sweet ending. Why not use them in this deliciously fresh pavlova recipes for a true blue Aussie dessert?Ballantyne Chocolates taste like their expensive Swiss cousins, but the great news is, they are made right here in Melbourne. Yumo!

Australia Day Mint Pavlova

Ingredients

    • 4 egg whites

 

    • 3/4 cup caster sugar

 

    • 1 teaspoon cornflour

 

    • 1 teaspoon vinegar

 

    • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla essence

 

    • a small pinch of salt

 

    • 1 packet of Ballantyne Mint Chocolate Coated Sticks

 

  • Fresh mint leaves

Instructions

Pre-heat the oven to 250 degrees F or 130 degrees Celsius.

Beat the egg white, when soft peaks form add sugar very gradually. Continue to beat until very stiff, then whilst beating, add salt, vinegar, and vanilla a few drops at a time. Add the cornflour and keep beating until the mixture is really glossy and will stand when cut with a knife.

Cover an oven tray with a sheet of cooking paper. Tip the mixture into the centre of the tray and spread it into a circle about 8-9 inches or 9cms across. Leave the centre slightly indented. Place the tray in the middle of the oven and cook for one hour, then turn oven off and leave the pavlova in the oven until oven is cold.

Top with whipped cream and then decorate with Ballantyne Mint Chocolate Sticks and fresh mint leaves.

Notes

An electric food-mixer is helpful when beating the mixture.

The pavlova will have a slightly crisp outside and a soft, marshmallow-like inside.

January 21, 2003