Australians

Cheating: 1 In 3 Australians Have Done It

Cheating. Have you ever done it? What about your partner? Of course not. They’d never do that to you would they. Yet what if I told you about 37 per cent of the Australian population have done it at one time or another. Would you still be so confident in thinking that your partner has never ever sneaked off to do the dirty? Don’t think for a second that being male makes any difference to the heartbreak of cheating either. The gap is closing in and has been sitting at less than four percent.

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Where do these cheating stats come from?

Now you might be wondering where I’m getting these numbers. Well the Great Australian Sex Census is possibly the place to get stats on sexual behaviour in Australia. With over 17,000 Australian participants, the census collects data from a wide cross section of our public. Some have questioned the validity of responses. Apparently people aren’t very honest about their sex lives. Hmmm, who would of thought? I reckon though if it’s good enough for most of the top news publications in Australia, it’s probably as reputable a sex survey as we’re ever going to get.

The reasons behind cheating

So why do people cheat? Most men’s and women’s motivations are fairly similar. A recent study by a team of geneticists and neuroscientists examined the possibility that genes may have something to do with it. They concluded that genes could account for about 62 per cent of cheating behaviour in men and 40 per cent in women. Therefore, one reason for cheating maybe genetic or passed down through observed behaviour within a family.

Engaging in sexual activity they won’t ask their partner to perform is another one. Desire or to be desired, the thrill of the chase, excitement of a new lover, wanting variety or a shift in their intimate relationship are some more. Plus we can’t rule out the revenge bonk. People discover their partner’s are cheating on them and can’t resist.

The greatest discrepancy lies in the physical desire of men verses the emotional desire in women. Plus cheating men are often satisfied with their relationships but women generally aren’t. These are fairly similar to views on infidelity.

Getting upset about cheating

According to researchers, heterosexual males are primarily concerned about the sex. This might have something to do with feeling possessive of their partner or having doubts about who’s really fathered their children. Women and people of bi or homosexual orientation are more concerned about the emotional attachment their partner might experience. They view infidelity as the ultimate emotional betrayal whereas men see the betrayal as mostly physical.

Tips to spot a cheat

While people are unique, there are some general tell-tale signs that a partner maybe cheating. Men should look at changing patterns in their partners confidence, appearance, happiness and contentment. If they don’t have any explanation like loosing weight, career progression or improved satisfaction in their relationship something could be up.

Ladies – if your man suddenly regains his libido for no viable reason after a dry spell, he could be beginning an affair. Men generally aren’t dissatisfied with their relationship, so he may try to reignite the passion there. It’s only when the affair progresses that men are likely to withdraw.

Cheating trends

Looking at the 2013-14 Great Australian Sex Census, it appears that around 30 per cent of cheaters get caught. So basically that’s a majority. Men seem slightly more susceptible to getting sprung though. Alternately females are more likely to be forgiven. It also looks like the cheating trend is declining. In the previous census (2011-12) cheating rates were roughly 45 out of every 100 people. However the margin between male and female cheaters has remained stable.

So what does this tell us? It seems the battle of the sexes is far from dead. While the cheating rates are almost equal, men are more likely to get caught but not forgiven. Women on the other hand seem to be getting off  lightly (pardon the pun). Not only do they get caught less but when they do there’s a greater chance the relationship might survive. Hmm, it just doesn’t seem quite fair does it? Then again I am talking about cheating. Fair really doesn’t enter the equation does it.

Image tv.yahoo.com

February 24, 2015

How Aussies Celebrate Australia Day

Aussies are customarily a pretty laid back bunch so it makes sense that Australia Day, celebrated on January 26th is basically r’n’r on a grander scale. BBQ’s, fun and fireworks are generally the order of the day.

The local communities plan events around the prefect weather and laid-back lifestyle, so there is always something happening close at hand. Multiculturalism is everywhere and most Australian’s are united in true Aussie pride.

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Granted, the weather is usually superb. It somehow manages to turn it on for the celebrations and is pretty much perfect for outdoor activities all over the country. With all the sun, surf and sand at their disposal the day is typically spent outside in private back yards, local parks, pools or beaches. The water is patrolled by volunteer life savers who are always on hand as a traditional Aussie icon in small red and yellow caps.

If Aussies do want to head further than their back yards or local neighborhood, extra public transport is provided to most larger cities. This is handy, because plenty of Aussies indulge in a few drinks and most have been educated not to take their cars out if they plan to have a few.

This advantage is usually taken as the sun goes down and the masses make their way into the cites to witness the spectacle of firework displays. It’s similar to New Years Eve except there are kids everywhere as there’s no need to wait until midnight. As soon as the sun sets the skies light up in sparkling lights and massive coloured explosions.

As the day draws to a close most Aussies make their way home. As long as they’ve had loved ones to enjoy and share it with, Aussies are pretty content to spend their national day of pride relaxing by the water, swimming, playing cricket, picnicking under the shade of a tree, watching children play and enjoying their freedom. There might be the odd disruption but Australia Day is traditionally quite peaceful, being more about family, community and coming together as a nation.

If foreigners ever want to meet an Aussie, and haven’t visited the land down under, visit a licensed venue on January 26th, particularly in the UK, Bali and other Aussie tourist and backpacker hot spots. Fueled by national pride and a few liquid amber’s, they will probably be a little homesick knowing the majority of Aussies are out celebrating. Shout out the words… Aussie, Aussie, Aussie! If the hear they reply oi, oi, oi shouted back like some national mating call, they are a pretty easy crew to spot!

 

Images via burdekin.qld.gov.au, nairaland.com, s.yimg.com, australiaday2015messages.com, playandgo.com.au, resources1.news.com.au, 4.bp.blogspot.comk, picviw.com
 
January 25, 2015

What Makes Australians Happy?

You know it when you see it, and feel it, but it’s difficult to define as we all have different ideas about what it is and how to get it… until now! New research has revealed exactly what makes Australians happiest. Catching up with good friends (85%), going out with a partner (81%) and spending quality time with family (80%) topped the list of things that made the over 1,000 Australian adults surveyed most happy.

Despite living in an age where social media is credited with connecting people and building closer relationships, nearly half (49%) of Australians are feeling overwhelmed by technology, with the exact same percentage (49%) agreeing that if social media didn’t exist, they’d be more inclined to see their friends in person.

The study by from Australian chocolate cafe, San Churro, found that while the effect social media is having on our relationships is apparent, it’s heartening to reveal that 90% of all Australians believe there’s absolutely no real substitute for meeting friends in person, rendering the glut of connections on social media worthless unless they’re supported by sharing real moments in person.

Further to this, while the nation is lively on social media, with the average person often having hundreds of social media friends, a staggering 39% of the country is feeling more disconnected from people than ever, with young Australians (18 – 24) feeling the isolation most heavily (69%).

Despite being firm believers in sharing real moments with our friends and family, there’s still a fair proportion of Aussies who will invest more time in communicating with their friends and family on social media than in person (39%). Those most guilty for this are women (43%), a nine per cent increase on their male counterparts (34%).

Clinical psychologist at The Happiness Institute, Dr Paula Watkins, believes the research highlights the important role our relationships play in determining our happiness:

“Relationships are key to happiness. When we have family and friends that we love and feel connected to, we are happiest. Relationships need to be nurtured and there is no substitute for coming together in person to build deeper connections.”

Australians, happy, happiness, connection, connected, social media

June 30, 2014

How Americans See Australia

As an Australian, it would be fair to say Americans hardly think of us at all. We are quick to call them culturally insular for this oversight, but consider the fact they have 320 million people of their own to consider. We see them through the kaleidoscope of American TV, and they do much the same thing with us. Steve Irwin is largely responsible for the perception of Australia as a land filled with poisonous animals. There is some residual fear they’ll be met at Arrivals by a gigantic spider and stabbed through the heart. Most people have seen the Australian version of Kath and Kim and they like our accent. They’ve heard of Tim Minchin and they’ve listened to ACDC. They say we never stop complaining about how expensive video games are in Australia and they admire our liberal use of the c-word. Then they usually say the c-word aloud. They say it just the once because they’ve always wanted to try it out. I usually nod and don’t bother explaining we’re not that liberal with it.

They say they would like to visit but don’t expect they ever will. And this is where the conversation gets wistful.

They ask about healthcare… ‘Is it true you have socialised medicine over there?’ They ask about long waiting lists and people dying of cancer, unable to access oncology doctors in time. No, I tell them, if it is urgent enough treatment will begin right away. That’s when they sit back in their chairs and start blinking. The TV show, Breaking Bad, ran for five seasons in the US as Walt raised the money to pay his medical bills by cooking meth. I like to tell Americans if they made the show in Australia it would go something like, ‘You have lung cancer.’ ‘Well, I’d better get chemo.’ End of season. Walt could have received subsidised chemo from a less reputable doctor his health insurer covered, but his wife wanted the best. There would still be deductibles and leave without pay, putting them in the red.

Healthcare is expensive for the self-employed, but often covered by an employer in the US. They take poorly paid jobs, ‘with great benefits.’ The major benefit is their medical bills will be covered by the employer. If they need to see a specialist, they’ll be assigned only those doctor covered by their insurer. If they want an expensive procedure like an MRI, the doctor will weigh a patient’s request against how much money it will cost their practice, should the health insurer not cover it. The patient will seek a second and third opinion, because they know treatments get denied because of the expense. The doctor bills the health insurance company at inflated rates to cover their own personal liability costs, in case they get sued for malpractice. Everybody is doing advanced math. When I call a doctor in the US, I haggle with the receptionist. “How much will he do a blood test for…What if I pay cash?” Usually, I do it on-line and pay a doctor I’ve never met in Texas for the referral.

The next line of enquiry is about college. If you have watched American TV, ‘saving for college’ is a plot device that comes up a lot. According to a Federal Reserve Bank of New York in 2012, the average US student graduates with $24,000 of debt. That is a four-year bachelor’s degree, a Master’s program can run it into six figures. Over 40% of people paying back loans are between 30 and 50 years of age. 17% are over 60.

The debt is a mix of government and private loans and here is where it gets ugly: the interest rate varies between 3.8 to 10 percent on these loans. These loans cannot be defaulted on, even with bankruptcy. Americans watched on television as houses slid into the canals of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and I heard one woman say, “And you know, they are still going to have to pay back their student loans.” If you are injured and receiving a government disability cheque, they will garnish this income. If you default on your student loan and your future employer runs a credit check, you might not get the job with a poor credit history.

But the taxes are low. The food and petrol is cheap. It has to be. It is the most wonderful place to visit for the diversity and the natural beauty and their courage, which looks a lot like cheerfulness. I admire the cheerfulness of the old man packing my grocery bags with his gnarled hands. It’s not what he expected to be doing at his age, but cheerfulness is the enemy of entitlement. It says, I’m getting on with it.

So they see us funny and laid-back. Our humour is blunt and we take the piss, which sometimes confuses them. Making fun of an American is a bit like teasing the girl with an anxiety disorder. She looks bewildered at first and then her feelings get hurt. And they see Australia as a place they wouldn’t mind living but can’t afford to visit and they hope to get here someday and know they probably won’t.

Vivienne Walshe is an Australian playwright and screenwriter. Her plays have been highly awarded and published by Currency Press. As an actress she appeared on The Secret Life of Us and many other television shows and performed in plays at the Melbourne Theatre company, Sydney Theatre company and Queensland Theatre company. 

October 20, 2013