Boss

21 Struggles Anyone Who’s Sat Through A BS Work Meeting Understands

Gouging my eyes out with ice picks is more appealing than another minute of this Powerpoint.

May 2, 2017

How I Became A Phone Sex Worker (And Why I Love What I Do)

I wanted a career change, and a career change was what I got.

September 22, 2016

Being Myself At Work Is Both The Best And Scariest Thing I’ve Done

It’s hard to be who you are in a world of uniformity. 

June 8, 2016

Girl Boss Hacks For Conquering Your Inbox

Do you ever feel your emails are managing you?

March 8, 2016

Why Women Stop Climbing The Corporate Ladder

Who the run the world? Girls! Who’s turned off by becoming a boss? Girls! A new study has revealed why women are less inclined to make it to the top and surprisingly, it’s not for the reasons that you’d expect.

RELATED: National Sex Survey Reveals Women’s ‘Happy Ending’ At Work

Sacrifice

Unlike men, the study conducted by Bain Capital found that women preferred work/life balance and lost interest in climbing the corporate ladder after only two years due to the sacrifice. Apparently having to be on call 24 hours a day and networking on the golf course to secure a big deal wasn’t that appealing, reported the Daily Mail.

What’s more, pulling an all-nighter and socialising your way to an account was where the majority of corporate recognition came from. According to the study: “If corporate recognition and rewards focus on those behaviours, women feel less able, let alone motivated to try, to make it to the top.”

Sleep and health, or work and work? Hmm… What entices you more?

Confidence

Interestingly, after two years in a job, research indicated that women’s confidence fell by up to 60 per cent as opposed to men whose confidence only dropped by 10 per cent. A similar statistic emerged when the participants were asked if they thought they had what it takes to become the director – 27 per cent of the ladies said yes, however over a two year span it decreased to only 13 per cent.

Again, this could come down to the fact that women actually wanted a life outside of their job – and becoming director, well, let’s face it, would mean no life.  

Demoralising

Telling “war stories” and sacrificing everything to close a sale was found to be “demoralising” to women. While men were seemingly happy to do whatever it took, whenever it took, women had more of a conscious. One women was quoted in the study as saying: “I just kept sinking lower in my chair and thinking that I would never be able to make it to the senior ranks if this was what it took.”

The two-year itch

While the study of 1000 participants found that both sexes initially had the same aspiration to advance upon starting a new job, this dropped for women dramatically over two years. Among new employees, 43 per cent of females and 34 per cent of males said they wanted to be the boss, however this decreased to 16 per cent for women over a two year period while men stayed the same.

According to the findings, some women said they weren’t “cut out” for top management and others were told that they didn’t “really want it.” It seems the expectations that come with being the top dog just aren’t realistic for women. In all fairness, perhaps they’re just not realistic in general.

May 28, 2015

Top Tips For Women In Franchising

Thinking about owning your own business? Consider buying a franchise – you’re in business for yourself, but not alone which can offer peace of mind and a bit of extra confidence when taking the leap and becoming a business owner.

RELATED: All Work And No Play… Creating Balance In Success

In a nutshell, this is the essence of franchising; being a part of something bigger and more experienced. You’re working with a known brand and a sound business model with access to support networks and a strong marketing strategy. It’s the perfect solution for those who want the opportunity to own their own business, but may not have the confidence, capital and know-how to start something from the bottom up.

Buying into a brand with an existing presence and loyal following means a large part of the foundation work is done. But that’s not to say the rest is easy… success does only come if you work for it!! And there’s much planning, budgeting, forecasting and decision-making involved in ensuring your slice of the franchising pie is a fruitful business.

For many women who are also aspiring business owners, franchising is an attractive ‘tried and tested’ option, and many women often see success in the franchising game!

Why?

  • Women are often great organisers! They know how to plan and prioritise and have an eye for detail.
  • Multi-tasking comes naturally to females. Women are quick thinking, improvise and are comfortable with adapting to make things work.
  • Believe it or not, women in business tend to be more financially conservative than their male counterparts! This means starting small and taking baby steps in growing their entity – a pretty sound approach for purchasing, owning and operating a franchise business.
  • Women are generally pretty open to building business relationships and aren’t afraid to tap into the wider community, including other franchisees.

You might be on track to look at franchise business options, but there are some considerations from those already in the thick of the franchising game, suggest to women who are considering going down this path:

Research

Look at options and business offerings that match your passions and your personality. If you enjoy fitness, maybe a gym franchise is a fit for you. But don’t go into motor spares, if fashion is your interest.

Remember, franchising is a long-term business prospect. Make sure what you choose is something you’re happy about so that you’re energised to make it work, especially during the down times.

Be a facilitator

Help create and maintain a positive business culture. Look to fellow franchisees as part of a wider team, rather than competitors. It will help you (and the overall franchise system) grow! And you know those organisation skill sets – use them!

Ask for help

You have the networks and resources available to you for guidance, so utilise them! You’re not expected to be able to do everything, so focus on your strengths and hire a team for their expertise (and perhaps any of your own weaknesses). Don’t be afraid to bounce off other experienced franchisees for their guidance.

Think outside the box

The beauty of franchising is that you do have support and formal planned activities, but you also have the freedom and I suppose responsibilities to implement your own ideas that really make your part of the business your own. Do this, but do it within the framework of your brand… Anything that’s worthwhile will garner support from your franchisor.

And as history has it, some of the most successful franchise brands have women working with them… so we say what are you waiting for?

Visit ffco.com.au for some great franchising tips and business opportunities with Franchised Food Company including brands like Cold Rock, Trampoline Gelato, Pretzel World, Nutshack, Mr Whippy and Europa Coffee.

Image via imgkid.com

October 20, 2014

How to get that pay rise (contd)

A matter of timing

Timing is critical. When it’s easy for a boss to say ‘no’, then she or he will do so. Friday afternoon is a good time to ask for a pay rise because the boss can then spend the weekend worrying that you might leave.It also gives the boss time to work out how they are going to justify your increase to their own direct report. Max says: “Do not rush your boss into a decision. Use phrases like ‘I would like you to think about’ and ‘at an appropriate time …’

“So it goes something like this: ‘Jane/Jack as you know I have been with you now for nine months and the job has developed in some interesting ways, particularly in xyz.

“I would like you to review my salary arrangements. As you know the range for my job is from x to y. I don’t expect an answer immediately as I know you will want to think through my contribution and my market value.

“However, you can appreciate that I would not have mentioned this unless I had given it a lot of thought. Thank you for this opportunity Jack/Jane. I know you will do your best for me.”

Finally, remember the second rule of negotiation, “if you don’t ask, you

don’t get”

Interpreting the answer

Recruitment consultants would also add a piece of advice about what to do if you are turned down.

It’s all in the delivery. If the boss says to someone ‘we can’t right now but let’s look at it in three months or six months’ then they probably mean it.

However, if your direct report delivers an outright ‘no’ then you might want to think about joining another company.

Make sure you do your research. If you are in sales or another revenue generating positions your chances are better than those that are not.

Story by Kate Southam, editor of CareerOne. Go to www.careerone.com.aufor more career related articles. Job hunting and workplace questions can

be directed to CareerOne by emailing: editor@careerone.com.au

July 8, 2003