Breastfeeding

This Australian Senator Just Made History By Breastfeeding Her Daughter At Work

No big deal, she was just doing her job  – on the floor of Parliament.

May 11, 2017

Unpopular Opinion: Parents Need To Shut The Hell Up

Please, keep your opinions to yourself. 

6 Things All Childfree People Want Their Parent Friends To Understand

Catch-ups at play areas are okay. Baby photo spamming is not.

July 5, 2016

I Took Antidepressants To Deal With My ADHD

Better living through chemistry is a blessing.

June 14, 2016

The Truth About Breastfeeding

Breast isn’t always best.

December 3, 2015

Is Breast Really Best? Formula Vs Breastfeeding

Everyone’s got an opinion. 

October 29, 2015

The 411 About Breastfeeding And Breast Augmentation

Have you ever thought about feeding after a breast augmentation procedure? According to a recent study at the University of Sydney, one in five women who have breast implants don’t breast-feed their babies, with researchers speculating that those who don’t may be worried about compromising their implants or transmitting implant materials into their breast milk.

RELATED: Myth-Busting Breast Augmentation

According to Dr Huy Tang, Cosmetic Surgeon at Australia’s largest cosmetic surgery provider, The Cosmetic Institute, despite being the most popular cosmetic surgery procedure on the planet, there are still many myths surrounding breast augmentation – particularly when it comes to pregnancy and a woman’s ability to breastfeed following the procedure.

“It’s a common misconception that once a woman has breast implants, she can’t breastfeed. But the fact is, I’ve operated on many women who have gone on to successfully breastfeed their babies, with no negative affects.  That said, every woman is different and it’s important that patients are clear about the facts before they decide for or against breastfeeding their baby following a breast augmentation,” he says.

Here, Dr Huy Tang addresses a list of the most common questions concerning breastfeeding after breast augmentation:

Is breastfeeding likely to change the shape of an augmented breast?

“It is impossible to predict the change in augmented breasts after breastfeeding,” he says. “As a rule, women with smaller breasts would generally expect less change to occur when breastfeeding, compared to those with larger breasts,” he adds.  According to Dr Tang, in both natural and augmented breasts, genetic factors such as skin quality and elasticity are the major factors that influence whether breast shape is likely to change.

How much time after breast augmentation should a woman wait to fall pregnant or wait to breast feed her children?  

“We normally recommend six to 12 months post-op to allow the augmented breast to completely settle before falling pregnant,” says Dr Tang, who recommends visiting forums and talking to other women who have breast fed post operatively. “Recovery time can vary from patient to patient so it is important that you’re prepared to be flexible should recovery take a little longer than anticipated,” he says.

Does breast augmentation affect a mother’s milk supply?

According to Dr Tang, breast augmentation will not affect a mother’s milk supply. “As long as you are being operated on by a reputable surgeon and there has been no damage to the milk ducts or nerves during surgery, there will be no affect on your milk supply.

“Some women find it very difficult to breastfeed and a woman can have a poor milk supply regardless of whether they have implants or not, it’s rarely the implants or surgery that hinders the supply of milk,” he says.

Are there are any dangers associated with breastfeeding after breast augmentation, either for the mother or the baby?

A common fear among women is that their implants may “leak” and be toxic for a breastfeeding baby, however Dr Tang provides assurance that there are no known dangers to either the mother or baby when breastfeeding with implants.

“The implants we use at The Cosmetic Institute are the best in the world and are made of a gel substance that remains within a solid membrane and does not leak into the body, even in the rare case of a rupture,” advises Tang. “The chances of an implant leaking or rupturing are exceptionally low, however in the rare case that this did occur, there would be no harm to the mother or baby in terms of toxicity.”

Having said that, he does warn that it is crucial to find out what implants your surgeon will be using and whether the materials are safe should a rupture occur.

Will augmented breasts tend to be more sensitive/painful when breastfeeding when compared to non-augmented breasts?

When it comes to sensitivity, it is possible that an implant could cause feelings of slight discomfort in the breast. “It’s not always the case, but the added weight and volume of the implant can result in increased sensitivity,” says Tang. “Breasts generally become more sensitive during pregnancy and the added volume from implants could increase this sensitivity,” he adds.

Are augmented breasts more likely to sag or change shape after pregnancy and breastfeeding than non-augmented breasts?

The doctor stresses that while the implants remain unchanged with pregnancy and breast-feeding, the tissue surrounding them may change shape. “Regardless of whether a woman has implants, her breast shape can change during or post pregnancy based on factors including genetics, age and skin quality,” says Dr Tang.

“Since there’s no sure way to tell whether a breast will or won’t sag following pregnancy and breastfeeding, if a patient is concerned about this and considering having children in the not too distant future, I will generally advise them to delay their augmentation. Post pregnancy and breast feeding, we can ensure that all breast changes are taken into account before deciding on the size and type of implant that should be used,” he says.

Image via Mom Junction

June 24, 2015

Elle Refuses To Run Breastfeeding Cover On Newsstands

When Elle Australia recently debuted their June cover on Instagram featuring model Nicole Trunfio breastfeeding her son, the reaction was “overwhelmingly positive.” However, the magazine has since come under fire after choosing to only include the cover in a subscribers email and run with a safer version for newsstands.

RELATED: Breastfeeding Mother’s Can Officially #Brelfie On Instagram 

Hitting the streets this morning, the new magazine cover sees the 29-year-old mother fully clothed and holding her sleeping son, Zion. Initially, what was a powerful message that according to the magazine’s editor “enabled us to contribute to a necessary conversation around normalising breastfeeding,” is now being overshadowed by a creative decision or as the publication argues a “beautiful bonus.”

Nicole Trunio

In an article published on Elle.com.au, editor Justine Cullen wrote: “Yes, it was a commercial decision to run it on subscriber issues only. Magazines are a fantastic platform for being able to bring issues to light and take a stand, but ultimately, this is still a business. It’s still my job to sell magazines.

“A cover is how we do that, and for that reason, as the editor, every month you try to put forward a cover you think will appeal to the widest possible audience.”

Social media has since turned into a soapbox, with many arguing that Elle has in fact sent a negative message about breastfeeding in public by making it only available to a select few, those who are predominantly women. Cullen defends her decision, however, and pointed out in the post that it could spell disaster for the magazine if too many people complained.

“In an ideal world no one would have an issue with seeing breastfeeding on the cover of a magazine. But it’s not an ideal world,” she said. “Supermarkets are where we make a large proportion of our sales. Not everyone walking through a supermarket is our target demographic, nor are they all going to be understanding of the message behind this cover.

“If enough of those people complained about this cover and it was pulled from the shelves – or worse, if we were made to put a sticker over the part of the cover deemed offensive – it would spell disaster.”

Even if the issue was to be pulled from newsstands, one has to ask: would that have actually been so bad considering the amount of backlash the magazine is now getting?

On Thursday Trunfio took to Facebook to clarify her intentions with the breastfeeding cover image and asked that people “take this for what it is” and “let us normalise breastfeeding.” She then went on to say: “I’m so proud of this cover and what it’s stands for… Thank you to ELLE for being so bold and making such an encouraging, positive and healthy statement.”

So, in another bold move, has Elle Australia in fact made an unhealthy and discouraging statement by refusing to run the image on public stands? Cullen disagrees: “The idea of getting lambasted for doing something good but not doing it enough makes no sense to me…

“If we’re not willing to throw our entire business behind a message, does that mean we shouldn’t make the statement at all? That seems extreme and redundant.”

What do you think? Tell us in the comments below.

Image via Elle Australia and Daily Mail

May 25, 2015

Breastfeeding Mothers Can Officially #Brelfie On Instagram

Welcome to the 21st century; an age of selfies, belfies and now brelfies. In case you’re unaware of what a brelfie is, it’s a selfie of a women breastfeeding, and it is now officially allowed to be shared on Instagram.

So why is this a big deal? Both Instagram and Facebook are known for being biased against pictures of women breastfeeding  or any picture which shows a women’s nipple, for that matter  often claiming they are “inappropriate.” So recently when the social media sites changed their nudity guidelines to allow photos of women “actively breast-feeding,” women could breathe a sigh of relief.

Breastfeeding in public is nothing to be ashamed of, however it has always been a controversial subject, especially when photos of it are shared via social media. A lot of mums, including celebrities have experienced a tonne of backlash when posting their pics, with some even having their accounts deleted. Cue the #brelfie movement – an Instagram campaign that involved posting breastfeeding selfies in a bid to push back at social stigmas.

It seems that angry mums are a force to reckoned with. While the social media sites have still not allowed women to freely expose their nipples, they have since changed their stance on breastfeeding, post-mastectomy scarring and even nude paintings. “We know that there are times when people might want to share nude images that are artistic or creative in nature, but for a variety of reasons, we don’t allow nudity on Instagram,” reads the new policy.

“This includes… some photos of female nipples, but photos of post-mastectomy scarring and women actively breastfeeding are allowed. Nudity in photos of paintings and sculptures is OK, too.”

The new rules demonstrate a positive step towards changing social attitudes towards women’s bodies and breasts, particularly when it comes to something as natural and beautiful as pregnancy. It’s strange to think that sharing pictures of ourselves in scant bikinis with our bare backsides on show is more acceptable than a biological act such as feeding your baby.

So, what do you think of Instagram and Facebook’s change of policy?

Image via Shutterstock 

April 20, 2015

Tips For A Post-Baby Body

Losing the last bit of baby weight can prove difficult for a new mum, especially since a newborn requires round-the-clock attention. Incorporate simple yet effective exercises which fit seamlessly into your daily routine and watch the weight drop off!

Below are some detailed ways to get your old body back, and make the most of your time as a new mum:

RELATED: Why Working Mums Are More Productive

Breastfeeding

Eating a balanced, healthy diet and breastfeeding your baby will help you lose that baby weight at a faster pace – fact! When you’re pregnant, the body releases more fatty tissue so you have a solid foundation when the milk comes through. A relatively healthy diet with some exercise throughout the week will help your body to safely lose weight quicker than women who don’t (or can’t) breastfeed.

Regular meals

In order to sustain your body (especially if you’re breastfeeding), you have to stick to a structured eating plan. Start the day off with a big breakfast and this will give you enough energy to keep powering on throughout the afternoon (and even early morning). Eat lots of protein, fibre, and vitamins to keep your body healthy through this important stage in your life. Avoid skipping meals and dieting since this will only lead to bad-snacking and binge eating.

Drink water

Stay hydrated throughout the entire day and keep a bottle of water with you at all times. Water helps to flush out those bad toxins, and also keeps you off sugary treats (especially if you’re prone to snacking).

Light exercise

This doesn’t mean you should be in the gym for hours (who has the time for this anymore). A brisk walk around the block or even pushing the pram to your local shops or park is perfect for a new mum. Anything which increases your heart rate is probably a good thing, but ease into any exercise and make sure to listen to your body limits.

Healthy snacks

Fruits, vegetables, nuts, and organic peanut butter are all great snacks you should always keep in your home. A cookie here and there won’t do you much harm, but stick to healthy meals and after a while your body won’t crave the bad ones anymore.

Sleep

While catching up on your beauty sleep might prove difficult with a new born, it’s important to accept all the help you can get. Partners, siblings, grandparents, and friends are all around to help out, so you can have a quick nap or relax while your baby is also doing the same. Even a few extra hours of sleep a day will have you feeling refreshed, and will put you in a much better mood.

Image via Babble

November 16, 2014

The Importance Of What You Eat While Breastfeeding

A good diet is important for both mum and baby, especially while breastfeeding for energy and nutrients. When breastfeeding, you will need extra nutrients to ensure that milk supply is strong – it can take anywhere up to around 600 calories to make enough milk for a newborn each day. If you look at the serving guides for a breastfeeding woman, the suggestion is to obtain your additional calories through vegetables and complex carbohydrates like wholegrain cereals and grains.

One of the reasons behind the additional servings of these food groups is because breastfeeding women need additional fibre to aid with digestion. Some good sources of wholegrain cereals and grains include foods like:

  • Quinoa
  • Wholegrain breads
  • Brown rice
  • Wild rice
  • Bulgar (such as tabouli)
  • Barley

These foods can easily be fit into your day with the below meal suggestions:

  • Quinoa salad with chickpeas and prawns
  • A yummy nut butter and banana wholegrain sandwich
  • Brown rice substituted in a risotto dish
  • A wild rice stir fry
  • Bulgar in some tabouli with some grilled chicken
  • A yummy veggie soup with some barley to boost

Some foods that are best to be avoided while breastfeeding, as they may cause issues for both mum and baby such as, sickness, eczema, colic, irritablitiy or trouble sleeping include:

  • Milk, dairy, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and spicy foods have been linked to colic
  • Too much caffeine, which can make your bub restless
  • Eggs and peanuts, which have been linked to allergies in babies

For more information on what to eat while breastfeeding and for daily meal plans and recipe ideas head to www.losebabyweight.com.au. Signups for healthymummy.com 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge start from August 1 for only $49.95 with the challenge beginning on September 1. The HealthyMummy.com 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge covers everything mums need to know about losing their weight in a safe and healthy way. The plans have been created by the very best nutritionists, post natal exercise physiologists, midwifes and most importantly mums to ensure optimal nutrition and ease for all mums – including those breastfeeding. The 28 Day Weight Loss challenge provides over 100 brand new healthy recipes that are easy to follow, perfect for a busy mums lifestyle and great for the rest of the family too. These are catered, realistic solutions for mums who need time efficient options. 

July 23, 2014

Is Breastfeeding In Public Still Taboo?

It was last Monday, when a friend in Dallas posted a rather shocking message on Facebook. From the words she had chosen to compose the post, I knew she was dreadfully disturbed. She wrote: “I am embarrassed and exasperated. How can someone have the guts to come up to me and stop me from feeding my own child in my own car?  Who the hell gave him the authority to walk straight up to me and give me these shitty orders? Is it a crime to feed my baby? All I was doing was breastfeeding my child in my bloody fucking car. If he finds it so provocative and annoying, he better go f**k himself.”

A security guard outside a grocery store had stopped her from breastfeeding her six-month-old, saying it was not allowed in public and that “she shouldn’t create a scene”. She was so shocked she stopped instantly. It was only when she returned home, she realised the humiliation she had been put through. When she couldn’t put up with it any longer, she decided to share it with her mother and some close friends, some of whom asked if she had been exposing too much.

“I was completely covered,” she insisted. I ask, what is so strange or mortifying about breastfeeding in public that impedes men and many women to settle over a reciprocated conclusion? Since when has having food become taboo. After all, it’s all about feeding your helpless, hungry child when it needs to be fed. Isn’t it as simple as any adult stepping into a restaurant when hunger calls? Have you ever thought about taking your meal inside a toilet or a private area? Why should your baby, then.

I advised my friend to do exactly what an Australian mother of two did this Friday at The Children’s Hospital in Westmead, Sydney, where she was stopped from breastfeeding her sick son in the children’s lunch area. A mother’s outrage, a nurse in protest and media coverage of the incident forced the hospital administration to apologise a few hours later. I tried to encourage her to be as audacious as this mother and retaliate. I suggested she must file a harassment complaint against the security guard and ensure that he be charged for the mental agony he had caused her and for depriving her child of her right to be fed.

After all, it’s not illegal to breastfeed in public. In fact, most countries, including Australia and the United States, protect a woman’s right to breastfeed in any place, public or private. Under some state laws, stopping a women from nursing in public or forcing her to cover up is a violation of her civil rights, allowing her to exercise her legal rights to sue for damages in a court of law.

What I find more interesting and amusing, however, is when my friends with children give me what-to-expect-as-a-new-mum advice. Arranging alternatives for breastfeeding somehow makes it to the top of the list.  “There would be instances when you wouldn’t be able to breastfeed, for instance in public,” they warn me. But, who decides on that after all? Doesn’t it work according to when the baby needs it? I had not made up my mind about it until I came across the When Nurture Calls campaign, designed by art students at the University of North Texas. This thought-provoking series of advertisements shows mothers breastfeeding in unhygienic, cramped public bathrooms with punchlines such as ‘private dining’ and ‘will you eat here?’ making the viewer rethink about the entire concept of breastfeeding.

The irony is the sexualizing of female breasts that encumbers a woman’s moment of nurturing and connecting with her child into something intimate. But sadly, it’s not just the men who do it, it’s also the women. Luckily, in an attempt to reinforce the beauty of the moment, some women in Atlanta are trying to break this taboo by taking ‘selfies’ while breastfeeding or photographing other women while nursing. After all, the only way to break a taboo is to make people see you do it.

Seeing these little angels enjoy their most favorite time of the day, safe and sound in their mother’s laps gave me goose bumps, and a tear or two.  I’ve made up my mind. I will not hesitate to breastfeed my child in public. Will you?

Image via todaysparent.com/baby/breastfeeding/10-tips-for-breastfeeding-in-public

 

By Ayesha Hasan

June 9, 2014

Survival Tips For Parents Of A Newborn

Caring for a newborn child isn’t as easy as dream-feeds, naps which seem to go on for hours and taking cute pictures while they sleep. It’s often a difficult transition which sees you going from parent to none, to parent to one. It’s best not to lose sight throughout the entire experience, and savour the precious moments with your child, while also maintaining some important ‘me’ time.

Have a nap

Whenever you put your baby down for a nap, try to do the same. The odds are that they won’t be getting in a full night’s sleep for a while, and it’s best to at least have a short nap when they do. Even relaxing with a good book or a cup of tea is enough to re-energise your body for the next few hours of the day.

Accept help from family and friends

Family members, friends and relatives will mostly like be offering to cook dinner, tidy up the house and offer support over the next few weeks. It’s a great idea to take up any of these offers which come your way, since it will be easy for you to adjust and not worry about menial tasks such as making the bed or cooking an extensive dinner for a while. Try to get some rest and focus on yourself and your infant.

Time out

To avoid feeling like a zombie, take some time out and get some fresh air. Even going for a small, brisk walk can make a great difference and shift your mood. Arrange these activities around your babies feeding schedule, and try to leave the baby with a responsible adult while they’re taking a nap.

Parents group

Joining a local parents group or keeping in touch with other parents who also have newborns is fantastic to your child’s wellbeing. Get together for a coffee to discuss how your kids are holding up, or chat away via text message if there’s something you need to ask. The more support you can get, the better.

Eat three balanced meals

Keeping to a balanced eating schedule can prove difficult for the first few weeks after baby is born. This is especially important if you are breastfeeding, as this is the fuel which will keep you energised all day and will carry through to your child through the breast-milk. Avoid coffee, tea and soft drinks if you are breastfeeding as this could decrease your milk supply.

What are some of your tips for new parents?

Image via nymomsworld.com

By Felicia Sapountzis

June 6, 2014

Survival Tips To Parents Of A Newborn

Caring for a newborn child isn’t as easy as dream-feeds, naps which seem to go on for hours and taking cute pictures while they sleep. It’s often a difficult transition which sees you going from parent to none, to parent to one. It’s best not to lose sight throughout the entire experience, and savour the precious moments with your child, while also maintaining some important ‘me’ time.

Have a nap

Whenever you put your baby down for a nap, try to do the same. The odds are that they won’t be getting in a full night’s sleep for a while, and it’s best to at least have a short nap when they do. Even relaxing with a good book or a cup of tea is enough to re-energise your body for the next few hours of the day.

Accept help from family and friends

Family members, friends and relatives will mostly like be offering to cook dinner, tidy up the house and offer support over the next few weeks. It’s a great idea to take up any of these offers which come your way, since it will be easy for you to adjust and not worry about menial tasks such as making the bed or cooking an extensive dinner for a while. Try to get some rest and focus on yourself and your infant.

Time out

To avoid feeling like a zombie, take some time out and get some fresh air. Even going for a small, brisk walk can make a great difference and shift your mood. Arrange these activities around your babies feeding schedule, and try to leave the baby with a responsible adult while they’re taking a nap.

Parents group

Joining a local parents group or keeping in touch with other parents who also have newborns is fantastic to your child’s wellbeing. Get together for a coffee to discuss how your kids are holding up, or chat away via text message if there’s something you need to ask. The more support you can get, the better.

Eat three balanced meals

Keeping to a balanced eating schedule can prove difficult for the first few weeks after baby is born. This is especially important if you are breastfeeding, as this is the fuel which will keep you energised all day and will carry through to your child through the breast-milk. Avoid coffee, tea and soft drinks if you are breastfeeding as this could decrease your milk supply.

What are some of your tips for new parents?

Image via nymomsworld.com

By Felicia Sapountzis

June 4, 2014