Exercise-plan-2

Get Commando Fit This Year

SHE’SAID’ has been lucky to snag an interview with Commando Steve Willis! I’m super excited to get access to this heavenly hot fitness guru and integral member of Aussie TV’s The Biggest Loser. Prominently dressed in army pants, singlet and dark sunglasses, there seems to be a lot going on for the man behind the muscle. So I wanted to give you a sneak peak before we have our little chat.

RELATED: Lose Weight And Keep It Off Permanently

The book – ‘Get Commando Fit’
The Commando launched ‘Get Commando Fit’ on January 27. Combining a 4 week workout plan with fully illustrated exercises and delicious recipes, the Commando motivates and inspires readers using essential building blocks required for a healthier, happier life.

Priced at RRP $29.99 and $16.99 for the e-book ‘Get Commando Fit’  is based on years of knowledge and experience in the health and fitness industry and aimed at regular people looking to achieve optimal health and well-being.

fitness, workouts, health, Commanod Steve, health and fitness

The program – Get Commando Fit Mission 2
Commencing February 16th 2015 is the Get Commando Fit Mission 2. To provide a little housekeeping info, the cost is $18.90 per week on a 13-week payment plan or $199 upfront. When you consider the cost of gym memberships or weight-loss clinics, it’s excellent value for money. Registrations opened as of January 1, and anyone wanting to participate is encouraged to register ASAP at getcommandofit.com.au.

To give you an idea of the program, it’s essentially a 13-week holistic life changing experience which addresses food and nutrition, movement and work outs plus shifts the clients psychology of these behaviours. Primarily focused on changing behaviours, bad habits and ridding clients of  self-doubt, program developers have set clients of all ages and abilities up for success. They provide everything needed to implement healthy lifestyle changes long term.

The developers include nutritionist Kelly Richardson, Chef Kim Wiggins, Sports Chiropractor Luke Khoury and Sports Scientist Selasi Berdie. With experience acquired in the Australian Army Special Forces, plus being a highly acclaimed CrossFit athlete and accredited personal trainer, the Commando’s unique experience and skill set compliment this highly diverse team.

fitness, workouts, health, Commanod Steve, health and fitness

Based on their combined knowledge and increased understanding of their clients needs, the program now offers even more flexibility. Mission 2 introduces ‘Get Active’, an innovative program which reintroduces movement into everyday people’s lifestyles. It’s perfect for all ages and abilities, promoting movement and healthy eating.

Additionally there’s the existing three tiered levels available. These include: ‘Get Fit’, ‘Get Fit Intermediate’ and ‘Get Fit Advanced’. Layering various abilities enables clients to get ultimatum satisfaction out of the program. Therefore the program now caters for people wanting to begin a health and fitness regime right up to advanced athletes and military personal searching for ways to vary their routine.

The program itself includes an introductory week, which provides upfront fundamentals and education. This is followed by 12 weeks of workout plans, daily recipes, healthy meal plans and the Commando’s motivation videos. Clients also receive regular individual performance and progress monitoring, ‘squad’ training to encourage group development and participation, plus motivation from the Commando himself to maintain motivation to keep going and inspire people to live their lives to the fullest.

fitness, workouts, health, Commanod Steve, health and fitness

This is certainly what Commando Steve Willis has done. From being a Commando in the Australian Army to TV personality, his upcoming interview with SHE’SAID’, will be one worth reading. In the meantime, if you’d like find out more about his book ‘Get Commando Fit’ or Get Commando Fit Mission 2 head to getcommandofit.com.au.

Image via booktopia.com.au

January 29, 2015

Weight Lifting for Women: How To Get Toned Without Bulking Up

I have been a writer for most of my adult life and it comes with one professional requirement: Spending most of one’s adult life alone and sitting in a chair. And so I have been spared a lot of the water cooler conversations women might have together at work. I have no idea what women actually talk to each other about at work, but I’m imagining conversations might turn to food and fat and diets.

I’m basing that assumption on the fact that my mother works in an office and discusses weight and its imminent loss with me all the time, and has done for the last 25 years. “I’m cutting out caffeine, sugar, alcohol and dairy!” she told me last week. “Why live?” was my response and last week, while the rest of the family tucked into a glorious meal of traditional Mexican seafood soup, she scraped at a container of hummus with a rice cracker.

When I told her I didn’t think it was appropriate to bring the tub of hummus to the table and scrape at the corners of it, she sulked and ate it over the sink. I have to admit though, she is terrifically and cheerfully thin. My body, in the meantime, was taking me from place to place okay and when I did put on weight, my mother would have to point it out because I hadn’t noticed. She would try to put it delicately at first, “You’re putting on a little bit of weight,” and in case I hadn’t got the message, she would add, “I’ve never seen you this large.”

So I would head out the door for a sluggish, painful jog at night and when gasping with breath, wonder at how it had only been 10 minutes since I’d left the house. It wasn’t a ‘relationship with my body’ one hears in yoga class that I was having. I was a head my body carried around with the hope that in return, I wouldn’t let it get too fat.

And then something happened to change my head and my body’s life – I started dating a man whose body looked like it stepped off the pages of Men’s Health Magazine. He would peel off his clothing and walk towards the bedroom and it was so laughably perfect, in the back of my mind I would be thinking – no one would believe what I am witnessing right now, even if I posted it on Facebook. Which would be in bad taste, so I can’t do that.

A body this perfect, I soon discovered, requires a bit of work and healthy boyfriends enjoy the company of healthy girlfriends and so I listened without much enthusiasm as he explained how I could get a body this hot. Weight lifting. The last time I considered weight lifting was at high school when another school girl mentioned she had tried lifting weights but it was making her arms too bulky. She peeled back her school jumper and that’s when I turned around to look at her and indeed, her arms did look thick. Nope, I thought, not doing that then. I’ll just keep eating apples and diet coke and see how that goes.

The boyfriend explained that engaging the whole body in a single movement, ie. lifting a bar bell over one’s head, or holding a plate against the chest and squatting, will transform the whole body rather than lying on the ground and doing sit-ups. Movements that use every muscle get one’s heart rate up and strengthen the core and the elusive six-pack is simply a result of having more muscle than fat, all over the body. I wouldn’t get bulky, he promised, but stronger and leaner. If that was something I was interested in…What I was interested in was keeping the hot boyfriend, and lifting a few weights over my head seemed like a small price to pay.

Because I am someone who doesn’t like to be told by their boyfriend how to lose weight, I decided to join a gym and talk to a professional, instead. A personal trainer took me for a tour around the facilities. “See these people on the tread mill, wasting their time,” he said. “They’re here because they’ve put on weight and they are shocking their system by running for an hour after which, their body is going to store fat in the awful event that it happens again.” Okay, so how do I not do that, I asked. “Warm up for 10 minutes on the treadmill and then follow me.” He took me, dear reader, straight into the weight room.

“Muscle feeds on more calories than fat and so if you build muscle, your metabolism is raised and it will stay raised for the next 24 hours. If you want to lose weight and get toned, walk towards the weight room and stay here.”

The weight room, I discovered, doesn’t have a lot of women in it. But the few women in there weren’t Chinese Olympic Swimming Team bulky, but lean and defined. My approach to learning the various techniques was to eagle eye what somebody else was doing and when they moved off the machine, to copy them.

Now I have my own routine and what looks like the beginning of a six-pack. At least when I scrunch forward and tense my stomach, there is definitely something brewing in there. My arms and shoulders are strong and my glutes have a roundness that will keep the dreaded Anglo-Saxon pancake arse at bay. And the greatest benefit of all is that when my mother asked me what diet I was on, I shuddered my head as if it was out of the question and replied, “I lift.’

The very best approach for finding your way around a weight-lifting room is to hire a personal trainer for a session. After which, they will try very hard to coax you into seeing them regularly and if you are like me, you might have to blurt out your after tax income so they will stop hassling you.

After your five to 10-minute warm-up, when you enter the weight-lifting room on your own, head towards with the machines. Ultimately, you will move off the machines when you have developed your muscle strength, but they will keep your movements stabilised at first. I walk over to the machine and I study the stick figure animation. I am not pretending to know what I’m doing and there’s a chance I could get it wildly wrong and nobody wants to be the one doing star-jumps on top of a bench press.

  1. Position yourself inside the machine and make sure your back is straight. If you have to curl or hunch your back for any exercise, you are doing it wrong.
  2. Adjust the weight so that there is some resistance, but you can do 8-12 repetitions before you become fatigued. If you can do 30 reps without fatigue, it’s time to increase the weight.
  3. Rest between sets or move to another machine within a minute or two. Your heart rate has spiked and you will want to keep it high. Be careful not to go too fast. The aim is to engage as many muscles in your body at the same time, even with the simplest exercise.
  4. If the machine has been racked with heavy weights which will require you to lift them off, I usually find another one that’s less intimidating.
  5. Create your own circuit by moving between three or four machines.
  6. Try to eat a small meal before your work-out and a snack as soon as you have finished. The faster you can eat that snack afterwards, the less muscle ache you will have tomorrow.

I lift weights for 45 minutes, twice a week and my body is toned but still very curvy. If I work out more than that, I start looking like Madonna’s Blond Ambition Tour. The greatest benefit of all is the word ‘diet’ never crossed my lips. The more I ‘lifted’, the more proteins my body wanted to eat. Carbohydrates didn’t feel as nourishing, anymore. And when people are struggling to put their luggage into the over-head cabins, I really enjoy that moment when I offer to help and plop that sucker in with the greatest of ease.

Vivienne Walshe is an Australian playwright and screenwriter. Her plays have been highly awarded and published by Currency Press. As an actress she appeared on The Secret Life of Us and many other television shows and performed in plays at the Melbourne Theatre company, Sydney Theatre company and Queensland Theatre company. 

September 26, 2013

4 Exercise For Couples


The great point to couple training is that you tend to pay greater attention to each other’s form, you stick to a training regime more adherently when there is two and more importantly you will have more fun. The exercises we list below can be performed at home, the gym or the beach.

Couple Knee Bends

Stand facing each other; take each other’s hands and have your feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart. Look into each other’s eyes (adoringly!) and squat down pulling away from each other. Keeping the weight in your heels and butt, focus on lifting through your legs and not pulling through your partner’s arms.

Twosome Walking Lunges

This exercise can be performed anywhere. It is performed and functions the same way as walking lunges do except you have the added benefit of holding somebody’s hand for better balance.

Crunching Couples

Lie on a mat or on the floor facing each other. Place your legs up and bent at a 90 degree angle pressing the soles of your feet against your partner’s feet. As you crunch, looking into each other’s eyes for focus. As you lift from your shoulders and look up and out you are forcing an isometric contraction in your abdominal region.

Shadow Boxing

Stand far enough away from your partner. Grasp a pair of dumbbells in each hand and stand with your feet about shoulder width apart. Alternating left and right arms, extend your arms punching to the side and in an upward motion. Do about 25-30 each side, then switch. For a real cardio vascular kicker, alternate with jumping jacks, with the dumbbells in your hands.

June 2, 2001