Gender

Why Is The Burden Of Contraception Always On Women?

We need to stop letting men off easy.

June 8, 2017

Gender Is Really Just A Construct To Sell Us Crap We Don’t Need

At this point gender basically exists to sell us stuff.

April 12, 2017

Stop Telling Me Not To Have Opinions Because I’m A Woman

If one more person tells me to stick to writing about fashion, I’ll flip.

March 14, 2017

Why I’m Not Afraid Of The F Word

Hello, my name is Kassi and I am a feminist.

August 18, 2016

17 Microaggressions Women Are Sick Of Hearing

Delete these phrases from your vocabulary, stat.

May 30, 2016

How Gendering Everything Reinforces The Fragility Of Masculinity

Why do men constantly need to be reminded they’re, er, men?

May 18, 2016

Fat Women Aren’t Taken Seriously In Job Interviews

My size is always weighed over my qualifications.

May 4, 2016

What My Life’s Been Like As An Intersex Female

I just consider myself a woman in the absence of a uterus and ovaries.

April 22, 2016

7 Things I Wish People Understood About Being Queer

We don’t fit neatly into your little box.

April 18, 2016

Having Sex With Women Doesn’t Make Me Gay

It’s offensively wrong to paint an entire community with one brush.

April 13, 2016

17 Girl Things Guys Will Literally NEVER Understand

I don’t get it. I just don’t get it.

November 11, 2015

IMG Signs Transgender Model: Is Fashion Getting Diverse?

As somebody who loves fashion, I still think it’s important not to romanticise the fashion industry. There is no doubt that it is one of the most homogeneous and exclusive industries with the large majority of models being white, tall, skinny, and female. Of course, this is not representative of modern society, so whenever somebody in fashion escapes that “norm” and thinks outside the box, it’s pretty exciting.

RELATED: The Best Reactions To Caitlyn Jenner’s Vanity Fair Debut

Last week, internationally acclaimed modeling agency IMG signed Hari Nef, a 22-year old transgender model and artist who has walked at New York Fashion Week and describes her occupation as “doing things in front of people.” IMG Paris had previously signed transgender model Valentijn de Hingh, while size-22 model Tess Holliday covered People magazine last week, so one might get the impression that there is a shift in the fashion industry to be more accepting and more diverse.

While these few examples of successful models outside the “fashion-norm” are a step in the right direction, it’s the motivation behind these business decisions that potentially remain problematic; does IMG sign a transgender model because they think she has the same potential as every other model, or because they know it will get a lot of publicity? Will Tess Holliday on the cover of People magazine make designers think twice when booking size-0 models for their shows? Probably not.

Either way, it would be great to see Nef on more runways and in more magazines now that she is with IMG, but she does have a point when saying that “fashion is having a moment with trans aesthetics, not trans issues.” One can only hope that this “moment” triggers awareness and ultimately turns into acceptance and more inclusion rather than exclusion.

Image via independent.co.uk

June 8, 2015

Stamping Out Violence Against Women

The World Health Organization (WHO) has found one in three women will suffer physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives. Of the countries surveyed, Japan reported the lowest rates of female victims of violence, (15 per cent) and Ethiopia the highest (71 per cent).

While in recent years, resources to help women in the aftermath of sexual or physical violence have improved, preventative measures remain poor. Violence occurs most frequently when both victim and perpetrator have low education levels.

WHO is calling for more anti gender discrimination measures and education programs to be established worldwide.

Professor Charlotte Watts and Dr Claudia Garcia-Moreno, leaders of the research, say that working to change the perceptions and attitudes of both perpetrators and victims of violence – correcting notions that women are inferior to men – will help reduce rates of physical and sexual against women.

“Evidence tells us that changes in attitudes and behaviours are possible, and can be achieved within less than a generation,” Professor Watts said.

Furthermore, medical and health professionals, as the first point of contact for most victims of violence, should be encouraged to provide greater programs to educate and assist perpetrators and victims.

“Health-care providers can send a powerful message – that violence is not only a social problem, but a dangerous, unhealthy, and harmful practice – and they can champion prevention efforts in the community,” Dr Garcie-Moreno said.

“The health community is missing important opportunities to integrate violence programming meaningfully into public health initiatives on HIV/AIDS, adolescent health, maternal health, and mental health.”

The researchers are lobbying governments to eliminate laws that encourage gender-based discrimination and violence, increase support, awareness and resources, and inject more time and funding into programs that eliminate gender-based violence, and address the issue as a global health problem, that can have lifelong medical repercussions for its victims.

Today is International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. November 25 – December 10 mark 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign. Click here for further information. Click here for the WHO Violence Against Women fact sheet.

November 26, 2014

How Normal Are Your Sexual Fantasies?

A recent study published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine sought to uncover the most common and uncommon sexual fantasies in men and women, and – perhaps unsurprisingly – found quite a disparity in the results.

RELATED: Ultimate Oral Sex Guide

The study asked 1,516 people (799 men and 718 women) what they fantasized about, and found that most of us are pretty vanilla, although the nature of what we fantasized about varied dramatically based on gender.

While 61 per cent of men fantasized about interracial sex, only 27 per cent of women shared this fantasy. Fifty-seven per cent of men wanted to have sex with someone younger, compared to just 18 per cent of women.

Being sexually dominated – spanking, bondage, forced sexual experiences – was popular among both men and women, but the latter was one of the most prominent fantasies for women (more than 60 per cent) – a fact the researches think links to the prominence of 50 Shades of Grey. However, women were far less likely to want their fantasies realized.

The most typical fantasies for women involved having sex in a specific place, while the most predominant fantasy among males was – surprise, surprise – the threesome.

Regardless of the differences, one thing was certain: almost everybody wants oral sex!

Within both sexes, urination (either peeing on or being peed on) is among the least common sexual fantasies.

See more of the findings in this awesome graph made by Reddit user, IronyAndWhine.

How normal are your sexual fantasies?Image via 2dayfm.com.au

November 18, 2014