Healthy-recipe

Carrot and Coriander Soup Recipe

Did your parents ever tell you to eat your carrots because they will improve your eyesight? This happens to be true! Just one carrot has nearly double the required daily intake of Vitamin A, which is highly beneficial for your eyesight and immune system. Beta-Carotene, a type of Vitamin A found in carrots, is also high in antioxidants and is good for your heart. This carrot and coriander soup is a great way enjoy these amazing nutrients and delicious flavor of these veggies.

RELATED: Kale, Chickpea and Chicken Soup 

Ingredients 

1 1/2 oz butter

1 brown onion, peeled and finely sliced

1 tsp ground coriander

2 sticks celery, finely sliced

1 lb carrots, peeled and finely sliced

1 3/4 pts vegetable or chicken stock

Small bunch coriander, roughly chopped plus sprigs to garnish

2 tbsp honey

4 tbsp sour cream

Method

  1. Melt butter in large saucepan over a low heat, then fry the onion until softened. Add the ground coriander and cook for one minute, and then add the chopped celery and carrot. Continue to cook, covered, over a gentle heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Pour the stock into the pan and bring to the boil, then simmer for 20 minutes, or until the carrots are tender.
  3. Set soup aside and allow to cool. Then pour it into a blender and add coriander leaves and honey. Blend until smooth.
  4. Return to soup to the saucepan to reheat.  Season to taste and serve in bowls garnished with a swirl of sour cream and a some coriander leaves.
November 10, 2014

Healthy Pumpkin Dip Recipe

‘Tis the season to eat pumpkin! This fall favorite has a place in every meal, am I right? The healthy pumpkin dip is both great as an afternoon snack for you and your kids, or with nibbles at your Halloween party. The best part? It is so easy to make! All you need are a few ingredients, ten minutes and a blender!

RELATED: Pumpkin Pecan Maple Granola Recipe

Ingredients

1 small fresh pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into cubes (you will need just over half a pound)

1 tsp cumin seeds

½ tsp dried chilli flakes

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Place the pumpkin in a pot and cover with cold water. Place on stove on high heat until the water boils, then lower the heat to simmer. Cook the pumpkin for approx. 10 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside.
  2. Add a tablespoon of oil and the cumin seeds to a small frypan and cook on low heat. Once the cumin seeds start to sizzle, take off heat and add chilli flakes. This allows both the flavours of the cumin and the chilli to infuse into the oil.
  3. Put the cooked pumpkin and half of the cumin and chilli mixture into a food processor (or bowl, if you have a stick mixer). Blend till smooth. You can add the olive oil, 1 spoon at a time, as necessary to help blend. The mixture shouldn’t be too runny, but smooth and dense.
  4. Finally, add salt and pepper to taste. Serve in a small bowl or dish, garnished with the remainder of the cumin and chilli mixture.
  5. Serve pita bread, or a crusty baguette.
October 31, 2014

Brown Rice, Asparagus and Goat Cheese Salad Recipe

Brown rice is the healthy alternative to white rice. Because it is unrefined – unlike white rice – brown rice still contains whole grains and natural vitamins, fiber, protein, calcium and magnesium, often lost in the refining process of white rice. It has a low glycemic index, meaning it releases energy slowly, allowing you to stay full and energised for longer. Asparagus is also rich in vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as fiber and folate. If this tasty salad wasn’t healthy enough, goats cheese is also low in fat and healthier than other cheeses made from cows milk.

RELATED: Miso Glazed Fish with Sesame Brown Rice Recipe

Ingredients

Serves 6 

1 1/2 cups long-grain brown rice

2 tsp salt

2 tsp vinegar or citrus juice

1 tbsp vegetable oil

1 pound asparagus, trimmed

2 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 shallot, minced

1 tsp grated lemon zest plus 2 tablespoons juice

4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled (1 cup)

1/2 cup slivered almonds, toasted

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Salt and pepper

Method

  1. Bring 3 quarts water to boil in large pot. Add rice and salt to water and cook until rice is tender, stirring with a fork occasionally so it doesn’t stick to the bottom. Drain rice, transfer to a baking paper-lined tray and spread evenly. Drizzle rice with vinegar or citrus juice and let cool.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add asparagus and arrange evenly in a line, as best you can. Cover and cook for 2-5 minutes until bright green but still crisp. Uncover, increase heat, season with salt and pepper, and continue to cook until tender and well browned on 1 side (approx. 5 minutes). Using tongs, rotate asparagus spears to ensure all are cooked evenly. Transfer to plate and let cool completely. Cut into 1 inch-long pieces.
  3. Whisk olive oil, shallot, lemon zest and juice, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper together in bowl.
  4. Transfer cooled rice to large bowl. Add asparagus, goat cheese, almonds and 3 tablespoons of parsley and dressing; toss to combine. Keep remaining parsley to serve.

Image via coldlife.com

October 23, 2014

Healthy Snack Recipe: Falafel

Falafel is a traditional Middle Eastern food which can be served as a snack, or as part of a larger meal. It is a healthy vegetarian meal, comprised mostly of chickpeas, and full of fiber and protein. Falafel can be served on its own, but is also often served in pita bread or wrapped in flat bread with salads and sauces, usually with tahini or hot sauce. Yum…

RELATED: 5-Minute Hummus Recipe

Makes approx 30

Ingredients

1 pound (about 2 cups) dry chickpeas

1 small brown onion, roughly chopped

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

4 cloves garlic

1 1/2 tbsp flour

1 1/2 tsp salt

2 tsp cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

1/4 tsp black pepper

1/4 tsp cayenne pepper

Pinch of ground cardamom

Vegetable oil for frying

Hummus or tahini to serve

Method

  1. Put dry chickpeas into a large bowl, cover in water and soak overnight. Drain the next day when ready to continue with recipe.
  2. Pour the chickpeas into your food processor along with the chopped onion, garlic cloves, parsley, flour, salt, cumin, ground coriander, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and cardamom. Blend mixture, scraping down the sides of the mixing bowl as required. Continue until you achieve a coarse paste.
  3. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, mixing through with a fork. Remove any large chickpea chunks. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-2 hours.
  4. Fill a skillet with vegetable oil (roughly 1 1/2 inches deep), heat over medium heat. Using wet hands or an ice-cream scoop (there is a special falafel scoop, if you have one), mould the mixture into balls. Before shaping and frying the whole batch, do a test one first. If the balls don’t stick together, put the mixture back into the blender and blend a bit longer.
  5. To fry, place falafel in oil and cook until brown on each side, rotating when needed. It should take 2-3 minutes to brown the falafel on each side. If it browns a lot quicker than this, your oil is too hot and the falafel may not cook through to the center. When you have it right, you can cook more than one falafel at a time.
  6. Once they are cooked, remove from oil with a slotted spoon and place on paper towel to remove some of the excess oil.
  7. Serve while hot – but not too hot! – with hummus or tahini.
October 6, 2014

Toffeed Strawberries Recipe

These toffee strawberries are delightful served with coffee at the end of a meal, or used to decorate a Victoria sponge cake or vanilla cupcakes.

Makes approximately 20 toffeed strawberries

Ingredients

2 x 250g punnets Victorian Strawberries

20 short skewers

2 cups caster sugar

½ cup water

pinch of cream of tartar

few drops pillar box red food dye

Method

  1. Wash strawberries and skewer with the short skewers or icy pole stick through the calyx (green end). Set aside.
  2. Combine sugar and water in a heavy based pan, and stir over a low heat until sugar dissolves completely. Stir in cream of tartar. Bring to the boil and add food dye.
  3. Reduce heat to low, and simmer toffee for around 20 minutes, or until it reaches hard crack stage. (Use a toffee thermometer – 150°C). Allow to stop bubbling.
  4. Carefully dip each strawberry into the toffee, and allow to set on baking paper until hard.
  5. Use remaining toffee to create a toffee serving disc or extra toffee shards (it looks great in a strawberry shape!).
  6. Once set, serve immediately.

What’s your favourite strawberry recipe?

March 20, 2014

5 Foods You Should Make, Not Buy

We lead busy lives, and sometimes convenience rules the way we shop. We show you how to transform 5 everyday foods that are quicker, cheaper and healthier to make at home than buy.

Hummus

We know what it’s like: friends are coming over and it’s easy to pick up a few dips and chips. But it’s even quicker – and cheaper – to make your own fresh hummus.

1 minute hummus: Place a can of rinsed and drained chickpeas, 1/4 cup olive oil, 1 garlic clove, 1 tbsp tahini, the juice of 1 lemon and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl and blend in a food processor till smooth and fluffy. Sprinkle over a dash of smoked paprika and chopped coriander.
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Salad dressings

It’s January so a lot of us have salad on the brain. Commercial salad dressings might seem like an easy way to perk up that bowl of vegetables, but most are laden with fats, preservatives and other nasties.

Make it at home: For a classic, zingy dressing, whisk together the juice of 1 lemon with 2 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Making a potato salad? Whisk together a small tub of plain yogurt, 3 tbsp capers, 1 tsp sambal oelek or chilli sauce and the juice of 1/2 a lemon. Or for a lighter Caesar salad dressing, pound 2 garlic cloves and 2 anchovy fillets in a pestle and mortar, then incorporate 1/2 a cup buttermilk and 2 tbsp whole egg mayonnaise. Loosen with the juice of 1/2 a lemon. Each dressing takes less than 2 minutes to make.

Popcorn

Have you noticed that microwave popcorn leaves a whole lot of popcorn – unpopped? What a waste! Not to mention the huge amount of artificial butter flavourings and salt! Buy popcorn kernels (much cheaper than microwave popcorn) and with only 1 tbsp of oil and 5 minutes on the stovetop you’ll have a bounty of super-crunchy popcorn that you can season to taste.

Seasoned popcorn ideas: Melt truffle butter while you cook the popcorn, then toss in a large bowl to combine. Grate parmesan cheese over hot popcorn with a handful of rosemary spears. Or sprinkle shimichi togarashi, an aromatic Japanese 7-spice seasoning, for the ultimate movie snack.

Fruit salad

When I switched from chocolate bars to shop-bought fruit salad as my afternoon snack, I felt like I deserved a huge pat on the back for eating healthier. And while hitting your local juice bar for a container of fruit salad is convenient, it’s not very smart for your wallet. Shop-bought fruit salad has a mark-up of around 500%, and making your own fruit salad takes less than 2 minutes.

Sexy fruit salad: Chop up your favourite fruits into bite-size pieces. Aim for different colours and textures – passionfruit pulp, halved cherries, tangerine segments – then add some finely sliced mint or a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Burger patties

In desperation for a quick meal, I’ve stocked my freezer with pre-shaped burger patties. But at around $6 for 4 thin patties, that’s at least double what making them from scratch are, and I love adding my own seasonings.

Tasty burger patties: Use any mince you like – turkey makes a healthy alternative to beef, or mix up lamb and pork for a really succulent burger. To 500g mince, add 1 egg, 1/2 grated onion, 1 tbsp chopped thyme, 1/2 cup finely chopped parsley and 1 cup panko breadcrumbs. Shape into patties, then push a cube of mozzarella or feta cheese into the centre, enclosing meat around the cheese. Refrigerate the patties for 30 minutes, then cook on the BBQ or pan-fry.

January 19, 2012

Top 30 ANDI Super Foods

Do you know ANDI? If you love your super foods then you’ll love this new way to see just how much nutritional value is in the foods you eat.

 

Designed by Dr Joel Fuhrman, the ANDI score is based on how many nutrients is in each calorie of food. The ANDI score system awards points out of 1000 with collard, mustard and turnip greens, kale and watercress coming in as the healthiest of all foods. Nutrients include Calcium, Carotenoids, Lycopene, Fiber, Folate, Glucosinolates, Iron, Magnesium, Niacin, Selenium, Zinc, and Vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C and E.

While you need more than just nutrients – fat and protein are essential to your health – Dr Fuhrman recommends getting 30-60% of your daily calories from this list, mostly made up of green vegetables.

Top 30 ANDI Super Foods

1. Collard, mustard, and turnip greens: 1000

2. Kale: 1000

3. Watercress: 1000

4. Bok choy: 824

5. Spinach: 739

6. Brussels sprouts: 672

7. Swiss chard: 670

8. Rocket: 559

9. Radish: 554

10. Cabbage: 481

11. Bean sprouts: 444

12. Red capsicum: 420

13. Romaine lettuce: 389

14. Broccoli: 376

15. Carrot juice: 344

16. Tomatoes and tomato products: 190-300

17. Cauliflower: 295

18. Strawberries: 212

19. Pomegranate juice: 193

20. Blackberries: 178

21. Plums: 157

22. Raspberries: 145

23. Blueberries: 130

24. Papaya: 118

25. Brazil nuts: 116

26. Oranges: 109

27. Tofu: 86

28. Beans, not canned (all varieties): 55-70

29. Seeds: flaxseed, sunflower, sesame: 45

30. Walnuts: 29

We’ll be bringing you recipes packed with ANDI super foods in the next few weeks. Will you be adding more ANDI super foods to your diet?

January 11, 2012

Healthy Hearty Recipes

Eating the right foods to suit the season can, according to ancient Chinese medicine, help alleviate all sorts of emotional and physical symptoms. These delicious, wholesome recipes will warm you up this winter!Baked Vegetables

Serves 6 as a side dish or 2 as a main meal

This simple dish support and calms the liver, relieving mild depression, frustration and anger. It also dries damp, strengthens the heart, supports the blood, warms the body and enhances digestion.

  • 1 small onion, finely chopped

 

  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

 

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil

 

  • 3 carrots, halved

 

  • 4 parsnips, in big chunks

 

  • 6 small beetroot

 

  • 3 potatoes, halved

 

  • 3 small kohlrabi, cut in half (if not available substitute turnip)

 

  • 5 tablespoons nuts and seeds, ground

 

  • 1 teaspoon kelp powder

 

  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon

 

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

Heat oven to 180c. In a wok over a medium heat, saute onion and garlic in oil until clear. Add root vegetables, continue to saute for another five minutes IN a bowl thoroughly mix all other ingredients with 3/4 cup of water to create a gravy. Transfer vegetables from frying pan to a lightly oiled baking dish. Cover with gravy. Cover with lid and bake for an hour, when vegetables should be soft enough to easily penetrate with a fork. Serve.

Lentil-walnut bake

Serves 6

This dish provides support to the heart and kidneys. Physically, it warms, strengthens and comforts. Emotionally, foods such as lentils and walnuts help us feel grounded and able to cope. The rising pungency of wheat germ helps lift depression and stagnancy that causes frustrations and irritability.

  • 1/2 onion, finely chopped

 

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil

 

  • 2 cups cooked lentils

 

  • 1/2 cup wheat germ

 

  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat breadcrumbs

 

  • 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

 

  • 1/2 teaspoon dry sage or 1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage

 

  • 1/2 cup lentil broth or vegetable stock

 

  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

 

  • pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 180c. Saute onions in oil. Combine with other ingredients and pack into a large loaf dish that has been pre-oiled. Cover, and bake for 30 minutes. Remove and cook for a further ten minutes. Serve.

From Food for the Seasons by Dr Lun Wong and Kath Knapsey.

July 16, 2002