Moving-house

Quick Tips to Help Parents Cope When Moving House With Kids

Moving to another location becomes even more complicated when you have kids. When it was just you, it was easy. You just packed up your belongings and shipped out. Sure, it might be hard knowing you’d never be back, but you could cope. But when kids are involved, they are likely to have some adjustment issues. Kids are more attached to “things” than adults, such as certain aspects of their room they liked, play areas they may be leaving behind, as well as friends and familiarity.

To help kids cope and make things easier, follow these 5 practical tips when making your big move:

  1. Talk to them about the move long before it occurs. Kids take some time to adjust to a new idea. Just grabbing them up and moving without warning will shake a kid’s sense of stability. So telling them far ahead of the moving day is one of the best things you can do. When you do talk to them about it, make it exciting, like a journey, rather than something to fear or dread. Kids are insecure and for many, moving to another place can be unsettling. You can calm some of their fears by making it fun and assuring them that everything will be okay.
  2. Give them a list of fun things to do at their new location. By creating more excitement due to the fun things they will get to do in their new town or location, you will diffuse many of the negative thoughts they might have about the move.
  3. Take books along that are about traveling. One particular book that is very helpful in this situation is Oh, The Places You’ll Go. Used in counselling settings around the world for people who are in a variety of transitional situations in their lives, this book can help kids cope with a move or any time they feel unsure of their future. It turns the experience into a fun adventure, rather than a scary ordeal. Another book that is great for kids in Australia is Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. In this book, Alex has a long string of events that he is upset about and thinks the world is against him. Over time though, he discovers that some of his ordeal is due to his previous actions, and not to external events that he cannot control. He also finds that no one event is ever as bad as he really feared. He also repeatedly says throughout the book, “I think I’ll move to Australia”. This book might help kids who like a funny repetitive prose with a good lesson, that they’ll get through the moving experience and everything will turn out okay in the end, even in Australia!
  4. Let kids ask questions about the move. The best way to find out what is on someone’s mind is to ask them. And let kids ask questions too regarding the pending move. They may wonder what the new city will be like, what will the schools be like, and what will the kids be like. Every culture, town and neighbourhood is different. Having an open Q/A session lets kids feel free to ask what might be troubling them and helps them feel they are more in control of the situation.
  5. Play games on the way. Find apps on the iOS or Android market that deal with moving or play old-fashioned games while driving such as “I Spy” and others to help them deal with long drives and anxieties about the trip.

There are other things you can do to make things better when moving with kids in Australia. Keep it positive, take the approach that it’s a big opportunity for adventure, enhance it with children’s literature that addresses these issues, and let kids ask questions and have fun. Time to get packing! Let the kids help with this too! Tell them it’s all a part of the big adventure. Oh, the places they’ll go!

By Sheree Jones, who works for the Budget Self Pack Containers team who are Australia’s expert interstate removalists for container removals. The BSPC team is full of parents and they are all happy to help give advice on moving with children or anything to do with your impending move. Connect with BSPC on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest or YouTube today.

July 4, 2015

Weekend Wit: The Interstate Move From Hell

Our interstate move was planned about six months ago. It should have been pretty simple really: Organise housing, utilities and a truck to move all of our stuff. Of course nothing ever goes according to plan, however.

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I should have know it wasn’t going to be smooth sailing three weeks prior to the move when a very close friend passed away. While there’s nothing funny about death, I’m certain he timed it just to add as much stress as possible – he was exceptionally well known to do that – God bless him!

So, off we flew for a day trip to his funeral knowing full well in three short weeks we’d also need to find the money to move back there permanently. Mind you, we had lent the cash to said friend with the promise he’d pay it back. Now, that obviously wasn’t going to happen. Financially we were pretty much screwed; and emotionally, well let’s just say our family was totally crushed. In hindsight, we probably should have put off the move; but despite our financial woes and tremendous grief, we soldiered on.

We packed up our belongings and were set to take our furniture from an uncles shed. In the meantime, we’d been lucky to rent an amazing holiday house on the beach and hadn’t needed it. The only thing was that the truck was full before we left the house. How did we manage collect so much crap? Hmm… Quite the conundrum.

So, instead of offloading to make room from furniture, we set off with the beds, our electrical stuff, a fridge (minus the shelves, oops!), a washing machine, two motor bikes and a convoy of beloved belongings, all of which managed to load up an entire four tone truck, a Tarago and a Mazda 626.

Mind you, we had no actual home to go to. All 50 plus rental applications I’d submitted online were never opened. Apparently most agents accept this nifty facility, but unless you correspond directly with them the application is 100 percent useless. Of course in my haste to secure a place to live, deal with our friends death and our increasing financial strain, I didn’t take any notice of this until 2 days before the move.

Luckily a dear friend offered us a place to live for three weeks until her lease expired. The place had no heating, 2 bedrooms and was ready for a wrecking ball, but she’d already moved out so it was vacant. Or at least we’d thought. In the days prior to our move her daughter required a temporary roof for her friends. The empty place soon became home to 7 tenants, all aged sporadically between 16 and 45, all of who shared only two precious house keys. Not exactly the touch down I’d envisaged for our long awaited interstate move.

Obviously things were looking fairly bleak, so off I trotted to every open inspection in search of a suitable home. Our list of wants quickly became a list of needs, and the race to find a home began. Despite fabulous references and being a former home owner myself, it wasn’t enough. Weeks passed before I finally spoke to a sympathetic agent and who directed me to an empty property.

From the outside I could see potential, but the tired old abode needed serious TLC – and that was just the exterior. I was determined to make this a home, so despite obvious flaws I booked an inspection. The chatty agent told me she had no other interested parties and she managed to capture my attention for the entire five minute of viewing. Out of desperation to find a place I sped through our list of needs; three bedrooms – check; shed – check; ducted air-con – yep. Where do I sign?

Within two days we got the keys; and soon after the power was connected so we finally left the halfway inn. Hurrah! Upon collecting a fist full of keys to our new home, only one set gave us access through the front door. Perhaps they’d had a bit of bother and had to change the locks a few times, I thought? The house on closer inspection was grottier than any place I’d ever lived. What the hell had I done? The agent had said there had been trouble with previous tenants but it was cleaned “beautifully.”

Beautifully? Really? Every surface in and out of the house needed wiping or scrubbing, plus the curtains all needed re-hanging and a damn good wash. We even used the high pressure hose to clean the bathroom before we used it because it was so damn filthy! Perhaps her definition of “beautifully” was skewed.

Not long after I discovered particular lights didn’t work, the electric roller door was now manually operated, the manuals instructing how to operate the ducting (which we’d signed for to say we received) were all missing, and the list of broken or damaged items grew with every space I inspected. I even managed to eliminate a baby snake in the backyard because it was so overgrown. No wonder no-one else wanted the place!

Now, I get that certain obstacles are put on our path to test us. But this, this was an exam and I hadn’t studied! Obviously this is just the quick version of our interstate move from hell – don’t even get me started on the longer version. But to give you a glimpse of how well it’s been going, we consistently have people looking for former tenants at 1am, and have even incurred a visit from the police in search of them. Oh, the joys!

By day three in the new place after having cleaned, sourced and collected furniture, looked after the family and squeezed in minimal hours of sleep, I did what any sane person would do: I lost my shit! I effectively announced my arrival to the neighborhood and let’s just say, they probably think some nutter has just moved in – a very loud one with multiple grievances!

The upside to all this? Well, sometimes you need to search hard for the upside. BUT, the house is looking more and more like a home and it’s happened in less than a week. After a good clean and having plans in place to neaten it up, it’s not actually all that bad. We’ve had some awesome friends who’ve helped us out along the way and found some very kind strangers who’ve donated furniture. The kids are really happy and despite rising tensions, my partner is back to the loving man I adore.

Image tapeciarnia.pl

May 9, 2015

6 Unique Uses For Your Leftover Moving Boxes

Packing your moving boxes yourself is a great way to save money on moving costs. It also gives you the control to make sure all your valuable belongings are safe and secure.

Once everything safely arrives at your new home, the unpacking stage begins. Here’s the question that really matters: what happens with all the leftover moving boxes? It’s easy to just throw these boxes away. But the truth is that you can use these boxes in a variety of creative ways instead of just sending them into the trash bin.

Check out our list of 6 fun ways to reuse your leftover moving boxes and see how you can take the concept of recycling to the next level.

1. Arts, crafts & fun (box fort!)

Sometimes the best way to reuse something like moving boxes is to let your creative flair shine. Try and think of these boxes like craft supplies. They can help you showcase your arts and crafts talents you might not even know you had.

Here’s a great example of how to take your boxes to a new level: build a box fort! Take your leftover boxes and stack them up to create a fun and exciting clubhouse for your children to explore. While this is just a temporary build, it can give you a whole day of fun that you kids will remember for years to come.

2. Create your own impromptu food drive

Once you unpack your belongings, you’ll have a huge store of empty boxes. Why not fill those boxes with something your whole community could value?

Try this idea on for size: take your empty boxes and fill them with donated food. Add a few canned goods from your pantry into a box. Ask your friends, family and community members for a few more canned goods to fill the boxes. Once your boxes are full, take them to your local shelter for donation.

This idea is great for two really solid reasons. First, you’re giving your otherwise wasted moving boxes another great purpose. Second, you’re directly helping your community – and giving people something they will value and appreciate.

3. Using your cardboard to create brilliant art

Speaking of artistic expression, why not use your extra boxes as a paint canvas? It’s easy to disassemble your boxes and form them into a big, blank canvas. From there, let your own imagination inspire you to create something unique, original and beautiful. Who knows you may create a work of art worthy for your new home!

4. Convert cardboard to decorated storage boxes

You use your moving boxes to transport your treasured items to and from your living spaces. But where will you put your treasured items once you settle into your new home?

With only a little bit of work, you can reuse your old boxes as beautifully decorated storage totes. For example, cover your cardboard box with burlap – and maybe some lace or other accent piece. You can transform a plain box into a storage piece that makes your home look even better.

5. DIY cardboard headboard

Five easy steps to your own DIY headboard:

  1. Take several leftover moving boxes and unpack them.
  2. Use duct tape to secure them together in the relative shape of your headboard.
  3. Take some simple cotton stuffing or quilt batting and lay it on your cardboard.
  4. Wrap a fabric of your choice around the cardboard and batting.
  5. Congratulations! You now have a quirky and custom-built headboard!

6. Homemade picture frame

If you have a boring or drab picture frame, why not enhance it with your own dose of custom-made flair? You can easily use an old box to retrofit a picture frame into something that showcases your individual style.

You can paint the cardboard or customise it with duct tape or other options to make it your own. From there, add a picture that also reflects your unique style. Your newly designed frame is sure to be a centrepiece of attention no matter where you display it.

As you can see, something as simple as leftover moving boxes can have a variety of uses for great fun – or even service to your community. You can use these ideas or other similar ones to breathe new life into something that would have otherwise been garbage placed out for weekly connection.

By Clive Smith, the Interstate Removals General Manager of Budget Self Pack Containers, Australia’s expert interstate removalists. Budget Self Pack Containers can help you move almost anywhere in Australia long-distance.

April 25, 2015

Housewarming Gifts Under $10

Ever been to a house-warming party and picked up an extra bottle of wine, bunch of flowers or pot plant on the way? Why not spend the same $10 on something a bit more thoughtful, useful and unique. Here’s a quick list of useful gift ideas for each area of the home, which you might consider giving your host instead.

Bathroom

Why not team up some liquid hand soap, wrapped in a nice hand towel? Choose a neutral colour like white, which goes with everything. How about a non slip mat, toilet brush or perhaps a bath or shower rack? These types of things can get grimy and something new will be welcomed. Head to a warehouse type outlet and pick up something quirky, which will look more expensive than it actually is.

There are also some really different sink plugs available now. Old ones will probably need replacing, so choose something unique which will suit their personality.

Bedrooms

Bedrooms are pretty personal areas, so supplying items like a stack of decent coat hangers can be ideal. These come in some terrific colours and materials, so you can choose something other than regular plastic varieties if you want to give something a bit unique.

What about removable hangers for over the door on it the wardrobe? These are excellent to have in rental properties because they don’t damage anything and they can be carted around. There are plenty of different types under $10.

Kitchen

The kitchen is a place where there are literally hundreds of unique and quirky items under $10. Coloured utensils, tea towels, oven mits, non slip mats, heat protectors, towel holders, sink plugs, dish or sink racks, and cleaning brushes or cloths are amongst the selection.

Alternately, you could chose to give your host items which every home needs; like dish washing liquid or tablets, bicarb soda, paper towels, plastic or aluminium wrap, storage or garbage bags. These items are all incredibly useful and will be appreciated by any person who has recently moved.

Laundry

Laundries and the things stored in them, are often filled with items people have needed to use when moving house. Therefore, you can’t go wrong with supplying a new broom, mop, buckets, basket, pegs, storage container for washing powder or tablets and cleaning or dusting cloths. People have different preferences with cleaning products, so avoid purchasing these types of items.

Outdoors

There are heaps of items which can be useful for anyone to use outdoors. For example; plastic outdoor chairs can be purchased for under $10 and you can team up with other guests to supply a set. Then there are items like mossie coils which come in handy, along with tap or hose connectors, outdoor brooms, garden snips or other small hand tools.

Miscellaneous

Torches, batteries, string, octopus straps, removable wall hooks, power extension cords, electrical leads, double adaptors or these types of items come in really handy. They will be greatly appreciated when the host needs to use them, but you might get a weird look when you hand them over.

Most of these things can be purchased from a supermarket, so why not pick up an extra item or two while you’re doing your shopping. Instead of wrapping items and wasting money on paper; put them in a bucket and add a bow.

By Kim Chartres

August 27, 2014

Tips to Make Moving House Easy

Moving house this weekend? It’s never fun, but Sydney Ute Hire’s Louis Synathis has a few tried-and-tested tips to help make moving as easy and stress-free as possible.

1. Simple, but often forgotten
Have everything packed up a couple days before the move. Leaving it to the last minute means that you run the risk of forgetting or breaking something or hurting yourself.

2. Pick up the keys beforehand
Ideally a day or two before the move and confirm all the arrangements with the real estate agent. If you can’t pick them up, have the agent leave the keys in the mailbox or hidden in the garden.

3. Charge your phone
Make sure your mobile phone has been fully charged the night before and that you put the charger in the glove box. Some of the other ‘essentials’ are water, snacks and a road map – just in case.

4. Have a plan for the day
You don’t want to start too late and then have to move in the dark. You may want to consider loading up your transport the night before so you get started earlier.

5. Have all your boxes labelled with ‘fragile’ or ‘heavy’
This will make the stacking process a lot less confusing and potentially dangerous.

6. Don’t underestimate how much you have to move
Make sure that your vehicle can hold everything you are moving, so make sure you have or rent the right vehicle. Nothing is going to cost you more time and money on the day than driving back and forth between locations to repack.

7. Don’t rush
Your goal shouldn’t be to load up and move as quickly as possible; if you rush, you run the risk of forgetting something, or worse, doing something lazily, make mistakes and could hurt yourself. Sometime you are going to have to accept that the move may take more than a day.

8. Strap everything down!
The last thing you want is your stuff rolling around in the back of a van or flying out onto the road and into traffic. Invest or borrow in some ratchet or occy straps to make sure everything stays where you want it.

9. Don’t try and do everything yourself
Unless you are a seasoned moving veteran, there is probably something you are going to forget about, so bring a friend to double check everything.

10. Leave the pets and kids at home for the move
If you have pets or kids, try not to bring them along for the initial move. There are a lot of moving parts and heavy objects around, so it could potentially pose a danger to have them running around as you move.

What are your best tips for moving house?

November 29, 2013

“Help I’m moving house!”

Back to reality. Your honeymoon tan is fading and you’ve suddenly realised that two is a crowd in that studio apartment you used to feel so cosy in. The wedding pressies are unwrapped and heart-felt thank you cards have been dispatched. The wedding is definitely over so now it’s time to give your marriage a domestic bliss makeover. Here is the SheSaid How-To guide!If you are about to move, it’s worth having a major clear-out before the removalists arrive. There is nothing worse than paying good money for someone to pack up rubbish you’ll probably end up chucking out!

The next thing to do is to contact a removalist company who will pack and unpack it at the other end – in other words do it all for you. Moving is not fun or glamorous. With a trusted friend as a contact to co-ordinate things, you can go on your honeymoon and return to your new home with everything and, we mean everything, in place!

If you are going to be a martyr and unpack yourself, remember to take a case of champagne with you. It solves the first-night-no-corkscrew problems and will help ease any furniture dilemmas with that new hubby of yours.

The first room to tackle in your new home is the bedroom. Need we say more? If you’re going to be surrounded by boxes and boxes you might as well try to have one oasis – the bedroom. Have a vase of sweet-smelling flowers by your bed or head straight to your nearest slick interior store like Orson & Blake (83-85 Queen St, Woollahra, Sydney, tel; 02 9326 1155) and purchase an expensive but divine Diptyque candle. Kate Moss, Sophie Dahl and Stella can’t live without them, and we at SheSaid think that you should start as you mean to go on in style!

Pack an overnight bag with the few things you will both need before you move. It will save you searching for your underwear for five hours.

Have your mail redirected.

Lastly, unpack quickly. That awful word “procrastination” will leave you with boxes lurking for months and months. This can be deeply depressing and could definitely become a pothole in your road to marital bliss. Urghhh we don’t want that do we?

 

June 25, 2002