Muffins

Criminally Low Calorie Brownies You’ll Want To Scoff Like Mad

With half the calories, you can eat twice as much.

April 22, 2016

Papaya And Coconut Muffins Recipe

Serves 12

Preparation time 10 minutes

Cooking time 20 minutes

Ingredients

2 cups wholemeal self-raising flour

½ cup shredded coconut, plus extra to top muffins

1 cup papaya, peeled, deseeded and mashed

¼ cup papaya, peeled, deseeded and finely diced (for decoration)

1 large egg, whisked

2 tbsp butter

½ cup honey

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180oC.
  2. Over a low heat, heat butter on stove until melted. Allow to cool.
  3. Combine flour and coconut in a large bowl and mix.
  4. In a separate bowl, combine mashed papaya, egg, melted butter, honey and mix well. Add papaya mixture to flour and coconut bowl and mix well.
  5. Place muffin cases into a standard muffin tin and spoon a heaped tablespoon of mixture into each one.
  6. Bake for 20 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean.
  7. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from the muffin tin.
  8. Top with extra shredded coconut and finely diced papaya.
December 21, 2014

Easy Spinach and Mushroom Egg Cups

Try this yummy breakfast recipe which is high in protein and easy on the calories. Add tomatoes, avocado or even a cheeky piece of bacon to the side if you’re feeling particularly adventurous!

The little muffins are perfect if you’re too busy for a proper sit-down breakfast, since you can prepare these overnight and store in a carry-all container.

RELATED: Check out the Easy Strawberry, Banana, and Pecan Muffins Recipe here

Serves 6

Ingredients

1 tbsp olive oil or vegetable oil

8 ounces white button mushrooms, sliced

10 ounces fresh spinach leaves

6 eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup shredded cheese (Parmesan or cheddar variety)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375ºF (or 190ºC), and lightly mist a muffin tray with Canola oil or non-stick cooking spray.
  2. Add mushrooms, 1/4 teaspoon of salt over a large skillet on medium heat, and cook until the mushrooms have softened in texture. This should take about 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the mushrooms with a spoon, and deposit them into another clean mixing bowl.
  4. Wash the fresh spinach leaves and add them to the skillet until they have completely wilted – about 10 minutes. Drain the oil, and remove as much of the liquid as possible by pressing the spinach into a paper towel.
  5. Combine the spinach and mushrooms into a bowl, then add the eggs, cheese, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon of pepper. Mix well before dividing evenly among the cups in the muffin tray.
  6. Bake for 20-25 minutes, then let them cool slightly before removing them from the tray.

Image and Recipe via Culinary Hill

September 22, 2014

Savoury Pumpkin Muffins Recipe

Some kids don’t like sandwiches so this muffin is a great alternative. It is a nutritious lunch or even breakfast option as it is high in fibre and low sugar and salt.

Makes 12

Ingredients

1 cup grated Japanese pumpkin

150g butter

1 1/2 cups self-raising wholemeal flour

2 tsp baking powder

1 zucchini, grated

2 eggs

1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

Method

  1. Cook pumpkin and butter in a saucepan for around 5 minutes until soft.
  2. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Then place mixture in a patty case-lined muffin tray.
  3. Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Bake for 15 minutes or until the tops have browned.

Recipe via The Healthy Mummy

August 27, 2014

4 (Deceptively Fatty) Foods You Should Stop Eating Now

Aussies spend an astounding $745 million on diet products each year and the diet business is booming. So, why are we fatter than ever?

Even savvy consumers are being fooled by ‘diet’ and ‘all-natural’ labels seen on the abundance of healthy food products available – especially on-trend and popular health foods like fro-yo. Often they can pack just as many, if not more calories and fat than most of their junk-food counterparts.

USANA nutritionist Ravinder Lilly uncovers the worst hidden fat and calorie foods.

1. Muffins
Next to a croissant or doughnut, the muffin looks like wholesome nugget of health. However, the giant-sized muffin concoctions commonly stocked in most supermarkets and bakeries are actually classed as being around three to four servings and can contain anywhere from 350 to a staggering 630 calories. In fact, some muffins have more fat and calories than a cupcake or doughnut. Even bran muffins can contain up to 500 calories and 20 grams of fat. Try swapping your sweet treat for one or two toasted crumpets (83 calories each) with low-sugar fruit spread or half a cinnamon and raisin bagel (160 calories).

2. Frozen Yogurt
The clever marketing of fro-yo as the go-to dessert for weight watchers has consumers under the impression that they can eat as much as their heart desires, guilt-free. Most non-fat ‘plain’ fro-yo however is 30-35 calories per 20 grams with around 20g of sugar – meaning that a large serve can crank up to 304 calories and 76g of sugar before you add any toppings. Most frozen yoghurts contain similar amounts of fat and calories as ice cream and fat-free versions are padded out with extra calories in the form of sugar. So, if you prefer it, you might as well enjoy a scoop of your favourite flavour of ice cream! Add sliced strawberries, blueberries and raspberries for an antioxidant explosion!

3. Veggie chips
Veggie chips are crispy, salty and delicious just like their wicked cousins, potato chips. They are made from super healthy vegetables making them the perfect unity of taste and nutrition, right? Sure, veggie chips are made from real vegetables rich in minerals and antioxidants, but when it comes to the fat and sodium content they’re actually in the same ball park as regular potato chips.

Make your own chips and wedges by chopping up some delicious young kale, spraying it with olive oil and oven baking it until it’s mouth-wateringly crispy. Or, slice some peeled sweet potato and cook with some olive oil until crisp. Yum! 

4. Supermarket salad kits
Salad dressing is one of the leading mischief and supermarket salad kits are high on the list of deceptively unhealthy meal options. For instance, one cup of a Caesar salad, adorned with shaved cheese, roasted croutons and dressing can contain nearly 400 calories and 26 grams of fat. In fact, when it comes from certain fast food chains, Caesar salad contains more fat than a burger!

Instead, choose a simple salad with a sprinkle of grated or reduced-fat cheese, opting for fuller flavours to add some bite. Add cooked beetroot and some red kidney or black beans – your body will thank you for the extra antioxidants and filling fibre.

What are your favourite healthy snack ideas?

January 24, 2014