Swimwear-tips

How To Tie And Style A Sarong

If you don’t have a sarong or two you are seriously missing out! Men and women throughout the tropics wear little else and once you get the hang of them you’ll understand the attraction. The fabric is cool and flowing, which is perfect for warm weather and provides flexibility to style them as dresses, short or long skirts, shorts, swimwear cover ups, scarfs, headbands and even turbans. Plus, packing a sarong or two into a suitcase can save travelers big bucks on excess luggage.

To add to the attraction, size isn’t a factor. The humble sarong suits any body shape. They are perfect if you’re pregnant or dieting because they adapt to whatever shape you are and breastfeeding mums can use them as a light throw over during feeding in public.

The main reason why people shy away from them is tying them. Unless you’ve been shown some sort of technique they can be a bit tricky. Additionally, there’s the fear that they will suddenly drop off in public leaving you exposed and stranded in your underwear! In reality, sarongs are actually a lot easier to tie and wear than many people anticipate. It won’t take you long to master and get creative, taking full advantage of their versatility.

Tying tips

sar1v1There are heaps of video on-line which will show you how to tie sarongs for various uses. So, instead of providing a step by step guide for each style, I’d like to provide the basics so you can tie them anyway you like and get inspired.

The easiest way to tie a traditional flat sarong is by using the material itself. The fabric is usually fine, so it twists and manipulates nicely. There’s no right way up either and the way you use it will depend on the size of the sarong and your body. If it’s too long just fold it. With a little more experience you can make shorts, mini skirts or dresses.

For basic use, imagine the sarong is a bath towel and position it as you would when you jump out of the shower and begin drying yourself. You should have hold of two ends, just like a towel. Position it at shoulder sar1v3or waist height behind you, depending on what you want to cover.

Bring together the two ends you have held and tie them in front of you or to the side. There will be excess fabric and the amount will depend on the sarong and your body size. Position this to suit your situation. For example, if it’s for a swimwear cover up you can let it be more revealing than you would for everyday use.

The image below will help you get a little more inspiration and show you the versatility of a single sarong.

Ways to style a sarong

A. The wrap skirt. B. Mini skirt. C. Wrap dress. D. Swim wear wrap. E. Mini dress. F. Halter dress. G. Shorts. H. Shirt

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There’s also the option of tying your sarong with purpose made buckles (pictured). There’s a huge variety on offer or you can use your imagination, get creative and discover what works for you. Bangles are an option for some styles as well as adding  beads or long hanging accessories.

These purpose made buckles are perfect for use with tube sarongs. They are just as the name implies. Instead of being a traditional flat piece of fabric, the tube sarong is sewn so it resembles a tube (pictured). If you have a tube sarong, using a buckle can be a little easier than gathering the fabric to make a stead fast tie which tend to slip due to lack of fabric. You can also fold them in half to produce a shorter skirt or dress.tube

Although tube sarongs are less versatile, they are still a very popular option for use away from the water. The attraction being that they tend to be less reveling. If you want to wear a traditional sarong away from the water and are deterred by the possibility of it blowing open, add a couple of large well placed safety pins to the inner side after tying it. This will hide the pins and keep your sarong in position.

Sarongs have also become a popular option for weddings in warmer climates. Prices start from around $25 and go up to around $200-$300. Regardless of the price, their versatility makes them worth every cent. They are addictive, so after purchasing your first one, don’t be surprised if you find yourself hunting for more!

Images via images0.zurnal24.si, curiousdesigns.com, swimweargalore.com.au, ecx.images-amazon.com

January 11, 2015

The Fine Art of Swimwear Design With Sara Winfield

From whimsical paintings and large-scale drawings to swimwear design, Perth’s Sara Winfield is one to watch. Here, the emerging artist-turned-swimwear-designer (pictured below), who founded her eponymous swimwear label this year, shares her design inspiration and summer swimwear tips with SHESAID readers, see below.

summer, swimwear, swimwear designer, australian fashion designers

But first, some background: modern and sophisticated with illustrative prints as its signature, the Sara Winfield label is aimed at striking a balance between creative art and classical and considered design and minimalism.

Entranced with line and colour in her art works, and renowned for her pastel-hued, fantastical beings, Sara is a young gun Australian fashion designer who’s been fortunate and talented enough to combine her two great loves of art and fashion design.

Related: Check out 6 UP-AND-COMING AUSTRALIAN DESIGNERS here or Julie Grbac’s Fashionable Life in New York

Since founding her art label in 2012, Sara’s held two solo exhibitions, a joint show with artist Anya Brock, received a commission at 140Perth and created artwork for model and interiors blogger Rebecca Judd.

Sara Winfield’s swimwear is available via the label’s e-boutique and select stockists nationally. Visit www.sarawinfield.com for more information.
In addition, Sara’s artworks and prints are available through commission or her online store – www.sarawinfield.bigcartel.com – with exhibitions planned for late 2014.

What’s your greatest love: art or fashion? Easy answer: art!

Who is your core customer? My core customer for both art and swimwear are generally people interested in design-based products who want something that makes a statement and is current.

What sets your swimwear apart? From first impressions, definitely the original, placement printing on my swimwear. But the process of creating those prints comes from a design process which I feel some labels avoid. I prefer to create a story of prints rather than just using stripes because they sell.

What should a customer look for in a good swimwear fit? A well-fitted swimsuit or bikini should make you want to ask someone for their opinion, not hide behind the change room door! It should make you feel confident, sexy and accentuate your assets.

Which body shapes are best suited to your latest swimwear styles? A small-busted girl! Being my debut collection (pictured below), I didn’t delve too far into swimwear that doubles as a booster, sucker, lose-10kg-underwear set! So, the tops are more suited to those with an A-C cup. I am definitely looking into styles that suit more shapes next season.

What’s best about designing swimwear? Definitely, getting your samples back. Working away on a laptop for hours upon end is so worthwhile when you get a physical product back in your hands. It just makes you think: “I made this!” – which is an awesome feeling.

What’s hardest? This first year has been hard because I’ve had to learn so much by myself. The actual designing of swimwear I find very simple! I could do four collections a year if it weren’t for all the “business” side of things!

What inspires you? My biggest inspiration is the outdoors. Natural things like plants, animals and landscapes. My mum always said that “nature always gets it right.”  Other than that, I create a lot of mood boards – colour is very important to me!

What other swimwear brands or designers do you admire? Obviously, Zimmermann, because both their swimwear and ready-to-wear are just incredible! I love Isabel Marant too, because who doesn’t? And ACACIA Swimwear because they’re so humble and sweet, yet amazing businesswomen!

What’s your burning ambition? I have given up trying to work out what “the end goal is.” I already know my mind is a busy place and I move on from projects or ideas quickly.

What are you currently working on? My spring/summer 2015 swim collection! Also, an exhibition of 20 or so paintings and dealing with a 10-week-old kelpie puppy.

summer, swimwear, swimwear designer, australian fashion designers

September 29, 2014